1181 Inspiring William Shakespeare Quotes (Free List)

William Shakespeare quotes are thought-provoking, memorable and inspiring. From views on society and politics to thoughts on love and life, William Shakespeare has a lot to say. In this list we present the 1181 best William Shakespeare quotes, in no particular order. Let yourself get inspired!

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William Shakespeare quotes

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.

— William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well


Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


The course of true love never did run smooth.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father refuse thy name, thou art thyself thou not a montegue, what is montegue? tis nor hand nor foot nor any other part belonging to a man What is in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, So Romeo would were he not Romeo called retain such dear perfection to which he owes without that title, Romeo, Doth thy name! And for that name which is no part of thee, take all thyself.

— William Shakespeare


Don’t waste your love on somebody, who doesn’t value it.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wand’ring barque, Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken. Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle’s compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

— William Shakespeare, Great Sonnets


Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines, And too often is his gold complexion dimm’d: And every fair from fair sometimes declines, By chance or natures changing course untrimm’d; By thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Love is heavy and light, bright and dark, hot and cold, sick and healthy, asleep and awake- its everything except what it is! (Act 1, scene 1)

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


They do not love that do not show their love.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


Do not swear by the moon, for she changes constantly. then your love would also change.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Love is not loveWhich alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove.O no, it is an ever-fixed markThat looks on tempests and is never shaken;It is the star to every wand’ring bark, Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.”

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swear he loves me.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehendMore than cool reason ever comprehends.The lunatic, the lover and the poetAre of imagination all compact:One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt:The poet’s eye, in fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;And as imagination bodies forthThe forms of things unknown, the poet’s penTurns them to shapes and gives to airy nothingA local habitation and a name.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!Did ever a dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant, feind angelical, dove feather raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of devinest show, just opposite to what thou justly seemest – A dammed saint, an honourable villain!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


…Who could refrain, That had a heart to love, and in that heart Courage to make love known?

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Sweets to the sweet.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. O, that I were a glove upon that hand That I might touch that cheek!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


I do love nothing in the world so well as you- is not that strange?

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


For she had eyes and chose me.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Love comforteth like sunshine after rain.

— William Shakespeare, The Complete Sonnets and Poems


O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O youThe doors of breath, seal with a righteous kissA dateless bargain to engrossing death!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


If music be the food of love, play on.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


I’ll follow thee and make a heaven of hell, To die upon the hand I love so well.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Under loves heavy burden do I sink.–Romeo

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


love is blindand lovers cannot see the pretty follies that themselves commit

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Love is merely a madness; and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do; and the reason why they are not so punish’d and cured is that the lunacy is soordinary that the whippers are in love too.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Love moderately. Long love doth so.Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.*Love each other in moderation. That is the key to long-lasting love. Too fast is as bad as too slow.*

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


I pray you, do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


If love be rough with you, be rough with love. Prick love for pricking and you beat love down.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Life … is a taleTold by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a weary world.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Like madness is the glory of this life.

— William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens


Out, out brief candle, life is but a walking shadow…a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Hell is empty and all the devils are here.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time;And all our yesterdays have lighted foolsThe way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a taleTold by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Of all the wonders that I have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear;Seeing death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.(Act II, Scene 2)

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


All the world’s a stage.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Life… is a paradise to what we fear of death.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Of all knowledge, the wise and good seek mostly to know themselves.

— William Shakespeare


The summer’s flower is to the summer sweetThough to itself it only live and die

— William Shakespeare, The Complete Sonnets and Poems


What’s done cannot be undone.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


This above all: to thine own self be true.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


That truth should be silent I had almost forgot. (Enobarbus)

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Out of this nettle – danger – we pluck this flower – safety.

— William Shakespeare


Cressida: My lord, will you be true?Troilus: Who, I? Alas, it is my vice, my fault:Whiles others fish with craft for great opinion, I with great truth catch mere simplicity;Whilst some with cunning gild their copper crowns, With truth and plainness I do wear mine bare.Fear not my truth: the moral of my witIs “plain and true”; there’s all the reach of it.

— William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida


He that hath the steerage of my course, Direct my sail.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


My soul is in the sky.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.Act II

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


These violent delights have violent ends.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


So wise so young, they say, do never live long.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


A knavish speech sleeps in a fool’s ear.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


There’s a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Men must endureTheir going hence, even as their coming hither.Ripeness is all.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man’s son doth know.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


There are occasions and causes, why and wherefore in all things.

— William Shakespeare


His life was gentle; and the elementsSo mixed in him, that Nature might stand upAnd say to all the world, THIS WAS A MAN!

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Tongues in trees, books in running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.

— William Shakespeare


Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him; The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


There’s little of the melancholy element in her, my lord: she is never sad but when she sleeps; and not ever sad then; for I have heard my daughter say, she hath often dreamt of unhappiness, and waked herself with laughing.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Yes, faith; it is my cousin’s duty to make curtsy and say ‘Father, as it please you.’ But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say ‘Father, as it please me.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


When I saw you, I fell in love, and you smiled because you knew

— William Shakespeare


LEONATOWell, then, go you into hell?BEATRICENo, but to the gate; and there will the devil meet me, like an old cuckold, with horns on his head, and say ‘Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to heaven; here’s no place for you maids:’ so deliver I up my apes, and away to Saint Peter for the heavens; he shows me where the bachelors sit, and there live we as merry as the day is long.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


LEONATOWell, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband.BEATRICENot till God make men of some other metal than earth. Would it not grieve a woman to be overmastered with a pierce of valiant dust? to make an account of her life to a clod of wayward marl? No, uncle, I’ll none: Adam’s sons are my brethren; and, truly, I hold it a sin to match in my kindred.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


I drink to the general joy o’ the whole table.” Macbeth

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


If [God] send me no husband, for the which blessing I am at him upon my knees every morning and evening …

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


My only love sprung from my only hate!Too early seen unknown, and known too late!Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loathed enemy.

— William Shakespeare


thus with a kiss I die

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! And, lips, oh you the doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss a dateless bargain to engrossing death!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Suffer love! A good ephitet! I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


These times of woe afford no time to woo.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Men’s eyes were made to look, let them gaze, I will budge for no man’s pleasure.

— William Shakespeare


Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear; Where little fears grow great, great love grows there.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Love is a smoke rais’d with the fume of sighs; being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes; being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears; what is it else? A madness most discreet, a choking gall, and a preserving sweet.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Viola to Duke Orsino: ‘I’ll do my best To woo your lady.'[Aside.] ‘Yet, a barful strife! Whoe’er I woo, myself would be his wife.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?Scorn and derision never come in tears:Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born, In their nativity all truth appears.How can these things in me seem scorn to you, Bearing the badge of faith, to prove them true?

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


For thy sweet love remembr’d such wealth bringsThat then, I scorn to change my state with kings.

— William Shakespeare


The course of true love never did run smooth said by lysander

— William Shakespeare


O, wonder!How many goodly creatures are there here!How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in’t!

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


And worse I may be yet: the worst is notSo long as we can say ‘This is the worst.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


True hope is swift, and flies with swallow’s wings.

— William Shakespeare


When he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fineThat all the world will be in love with nightAnd pay no worship to the garish sun.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare Collection)


To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


That time of year thou mayst in me beholdWhen yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hangUpon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.In me thou seest the twilight of such dayAs after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.In me thou see’st the glowing of such fireThat on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed whereon it must expireConsumed with that which it was nourish’d by.This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Full fathom five thy father lies;Of his bones are coral made;Those are pearls that were his eyes:Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-changeInto something rich and strange.Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong Hark! now I hear them, —Ding-dong, bell.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


One pain is lessened by another’s anguish. … Take thou some new infection to thy eye, And the rank poison of the old will die.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Death, a necessary end, will come when it will come

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Woe, destruction, ruin, and decay; the worst is death and death will have his day.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, / That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;Life and these lips have long been separated:Death lies on her like an untimely frostUpon the sweetest flower of all the field.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Where is Polonius? HAMLET In heaven. Send hither to see. If your messenger find him not there, seek him i’ th’ other place yourself. But if indeed you find him not within this month, you shall nose him as you go up the stairs into the lobby.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


The rest, is silence.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Clown: Good Madonna, why mournest thou?Olivia: Good Fool, for my brother’s death.Clown:I think his soul is in hell, Madonna.Olivia:I know his soul is in heaven, Fool.Clown: The more fool, Madonna, to mourn for your brother’s soul being in heaven.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


true apothecary thy drugs art quick

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


whats here a cup closed in my true loves hand poisin i see hath been his timeless end. oh churl drunk all and left no friendly drop to help me after. i will kiss thy lips some poisin doth hang on them, to help me die with a restorative. thy lips are warm.yea noise then ill be brief oh happy dagger this is thy sheath. there rust and let me die.

— William Shakespeare


This feather stirs; she lives! if it be so, it is a chance which does redeem all sorrows that ever I have felt.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


But thoughts the slave of life, and life, Time’s fool, And Time, that takes survey of all the world, Must have a stop.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1


Sin, death, and hell have set their marks on him, And all their ministers attend on him.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end;Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend.

— William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and Narrative Poems


Cordelia! stay a little. Ha! What is’t thou say’st? Her voice was ever soft.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


O my love, my wife!Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breathHath had no power yet upon thy beauty.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Romeo: Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.Mercutio: No, ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door; but ’tis enough, ’twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


ROSENCRANTZ My lord, you must tell us where the body is, and go with us to the king.HAMLET The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body. The king is a thing -GUILDENSTERN A thing my lord?HAMLET Of nothing. Bring me to him. Hide fox, and all after!

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark


La vida es mi tortura y la muerte será mi descanso.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Let’s talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs;Make dust our paper and with rainy eyesWrite sorrow on the bosom of the earth, Let’s choose executors and talk of wills

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel:Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him!This was the most unkindest cut of all

— William Shakespeare


Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia, And therefore I forbid my tears.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


And will ‘a not come again? And will ‘a not come again? No, no, he is dead, Go to thy death bed: He will never come again.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


These are the ushers of Martius: before himHe carries noise, and behind him he leaves tears.Death, that dark spirit, in’s nervy arm doth lie, Which being advanc’d, declines, and then men die.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


This world’s a city full of straying streets, and death’s the market-place where each one meets.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Noble Kinsmen


All things that we ordained festival, Turn from their office to black funeral;Our instruments to melancholy bells, Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast, Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change, Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse, And all things change them to the contrary.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Zu früh, befürcht ich; denn mein Herz erbangtUnd ahnet ein Verhängnis, welches, nochVerborgen in den Sternen, heute NachtBei dieser Lustbarkeit den furchtbarn ZeitlaufBeginnen und das Ziel des läst’gen Lebens, Das meine Brust verschließt, mir kürzen wirdDurch irgendeinen Frevel frühen Todes.Doch er, der mir zur Fahrt das Steuer lenkt, Richt’ auch mein Segel!I fear, too early. For my mind misgivesSome consequence, yet hanging in the stars, Shall bitterly begin his fearful dateWith this night’s revels, and expire the termOf a despisèd life, closed in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death.But He that hath the steerage of my courseDirect my sail!Romeo: Act I, Scene 4

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Every subject’s duty is the King’s; but every subject’s soul is his own. Therefore, should every soldier in the wars do as every sick man in his bed, wash every mote out of his conscience; and dying so, death is to him advantage; or not dying, the time was blessedly lost wherein such preparation was gained; and in him that escapes, it were no sin to think that, making God so free an offer, He let him outlive the day to see His greatness and to teach others how they should prepare.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


No longer mourn for me when I am deadThan you shall hear the surly sullen bellGive warning to the world that I am fledFrom this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell;Nay, if you read this line, remember notThe hand that writ it; for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then would make you woe.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Remember thee? Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seatin this distracted globe. Remember thee?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Love is holy.

— William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well


There’s a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood, leads onto fortune, omitted, all their voyages end in shallows and miseries. Upon such tide are we now…

— William Shakespeare


През дрипите прозира всеки грях, а мантии и шуби скриват всичко!

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it.

— William Shakespeare


Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow worldLike a Colossus; and we petty menWalk under his huge legs, and peep aboutTo find ourselves dishonourable graves.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Go wisely and slowly. Those who rush stumble and fall.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


There’s an old saying that applies to me: you can’t lose a game if you don’t play the game. (Act 1, scene 4)

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


He that is thy friend indeed, He will help thee in thy need:If thou sorrow, he will weep;If thou wake, he cannot sleep:Thus of every grief in heartHe with thee doth bear a part.These are certain signs to knowFaithful friend from flattering foe.

— William Shakespeare, The Passionate Pilgrim


Under the greenwood tree, Who loves to lie with meAnd tune his merry note, Unto the sweet bird’s throat;Come hither, come hither, come hither.Here shall he seeNo enemyBut winter and rough weather.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


A lover goes toward his beloved as enthusiastically as a schoolboy leaving his books, but when he leaves his girlfriend, he feels as miserable as the schoolboy on his way to school. (Act 2, scene 2)

— William Shakespeare


All days are nights to see till I see thee, And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I ey’d, Such seems your beauty still.

— William Shakespeare


Fondling, ‘ she saith, ‘since I have hemm’d thee here Within the circuit of this ivory pale, I’ll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer; Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale: Graze on my lips, and if those hills be dry, Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie.

— William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis


Thus weary of the world, away she hies, And yokes her silver doves; by whose swift aidTheir mistress mounted through the empty skiesIn her light chariot quickly is convey’d;Holding their course to Paphos, where their queenMeans to immure herself and not be seen.

— William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis


My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.I have seen roses damask’d, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks;And in some perfumes is there more delightThan in the breath that from my mistress reeks.I love to hear her speak, yet well I knowThat music hath a far more pleasing sound;I grant I never saw a goddess go;My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Then others for breath of words respect, Me for my dumb thoughts, speaking in effect.

— William Shakespeare


O, how this spring of love resemblethThe uncertain glory of an April day, Which now shows all the beauty of the sun, And by and by a cloud takes all away!

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


I take thee at thy word:Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized;Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


This fellow is wise enough to play the fool;And to do that well craves a kind of wit:He must observe their mood on whom he jests, The quality of persons, and the time, And, like the haggard, check at every featherThat comes before his eye. This is a practiseAs full of labour as a wise man’s artFor folly that he wisely shows is fit;But wise men, folly-fall’n, quite taint their wit.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune but to write and read comes by nature.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


O for a Muse of fire, that would ascendThe brightest heaven of invention!

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Give thanks for what you are today and go on fighting for what you gone be tomorrow

— William Shakespeare


The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


So may the outward shows be least themselves:The world is still deceived with ornament.In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt, But, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil? In religion, What damned error, but some sober browWill bless it and approve it with a text, Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?There is no vice so simple but assumesSome mark of virtue on his outward parts.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


We, ignorant of ourselves, Beg often our own harms, which the wise powersDeny us for our good; so find we profitBy losing of our prayers.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Modest doubt is call’d the beacon of the wise.

— William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida


Come on then, I will swear to study soTo know the thing I am forbid to know- Berowne

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


O teach me how I should forget to think (1.1.224)

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Educated men are so impressive!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


If thou dost seek to have what thou dost hide, By self-example mayst thou be denied.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Master, go on, and I will follow theeTo the last gasp with truth and loyalty.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.

— William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor


I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


I wasted time, and now doth time waste me; For now hath time made me his numbering clock: My thoughts are minutes; and with sighs they jar Their watches on unto mine eyes, the outward watch, Whereto my finger, like a dial’s point, Is pointing still, in cleansing them from tears. Now sir, the sound that tells what hour it is Are clamorous groans, which strike upon my heart, Which is the bell: so sighs and tears and groans Show minutes, times, and hours.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Love is not loveWhich alters when alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove:Oh, no, it is an ever-fixèd mark, that looks on tempests and is never shaken.

— William Shakespeare, The Complete Sonnets and Poems


Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Four days will quickly steep themselves in nightsFour nights will quickly dream away the time.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


When I do count the clock that tells the time, And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;When I behold the violet past prime, And sable curls all silver’d o’er with white;When lofty trees I see barren of leavesWhich erst from heat did canopy the herd, And summer’s green all girded up in sheavesBorne on the bier with white and bristly beard, Then of thy beauty do I question make, That thou among the wastes of time must go, Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsakeAnd die as fast as they see others grow;And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defenceSave breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty face from day to day.

— William Shakespeare


I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, heal’d by the same means, warm’d and cool’d by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that.

— William Shakespeare


[Thou] mad mustachio purple-hued maltworms!

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV: Part 1


[Thine] face is not worth sunburning.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Thou art a very ragged Wart.

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


How art thou out of breath when thou hast breathTo say to me that thou art out of breath?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


The small amount of foolery wise men have makes a great show.

— William Shakespeare


I will make thee think thy swan a crow.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Unless philosophy can make a Juliet, Displant a town, reverse a prince’s doom, It helps not, it prevails not.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


I’ll be supposed upon a book, his face is the worst thing about him.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


HAMLET I will receive it sir with all diligence of spirit. Put your bonnet to his right use, ’tis for the head.OSRIC I thank you lordship, it is very hot.HAMLET No believe me, ’tis very cold, the wind is northerly.OSRIC It is indifferent cold my lord, indeed.HAMLET But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion.OSRIC Exceedingly my lord, it is very sultry, as ’twere – I cannot tell how. But my lord, his majesty bade me signify to you that a has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter -HAMLET I beseech you remember.(Hamlet moves him to put on his hat)

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark


What early tongue so sweet saluteth me?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Mother, you have my father much offended.

— William Shakespeare


Afore me! It is so very late, That we may call it early by and by.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


she shall scant show well that now shows best.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


POLONIUS My lord, the queen would speak with you, and presently.HAMLET Do you see yonder cloud that’s almost in shape of a camel?POLONIUS By th’mass, and ’tis like a camel indeed.HAMLET Methinks it is like a weasel.POLONIUS It is backed like a weasel.HAMLET Or like a whale?POLONIUS Very like a whale.HAMLET Then I will come to my mother by and by. – They fool me to the top of my bent. – I will come by and by.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark


Glendower: I can call the spirits from the vasty deep.Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;But will they come, when you do call for them?

— William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1


There are more things in heaven and earth…than are dreamt of by your philosophy.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


There is more things in heaven and earth…than are dreamt of by your philosophy.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


And this our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything. I would not change it.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Knowing I lov’d my books, he furnish’d me From mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom.

— William Shakespeare


In time we hate that which we often fear.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Screw your courage to the sticking-place

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


O all you host of heaven! O earth! What else?And shall I couple Hell?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I could a tale unfold whose lightest wordWould harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand on endLike quills upon the fretful porpentine.But this eternal blazon must not beTo ears of flesh and blood.List, list, O list!

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;To lie in cold obstruction and to rot;This sensible warm motion to becomeA kneaded clod; and the delighted spiritTo bathe in fiery floods, or to resideIn thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice;To be imprison’d in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round aboutThe pendent world; or to be worse than worstOf those that lawless and incertain thoughtImagine howling: ’tis too horrible!The weariest and most loathed worldly lifeThat age, ache, penury and imprisonmentCan lay on nature is a paradiseTo what we fear of death.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens to the which our wills are gardeners.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


…what care I for words? Yet words do wellWhen he that speaks them pleases those that hear.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Words are easy, like the wind; Faithful friends are hard to find.

— William Shakespeare, The Passionate Pilgrim


Give me that man that is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him in my heart’s core, in my heart of heart, as I do thee.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I have unclasp’d to thee the book even of my secret soul.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, All losses are restored and sorrows end.

— William Shakespeare


Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;But do not dull thy palm with entertainmentOf each new-hatch’d, unfledg’d comrade.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


This hand shall never more come near thee with such friendship

— William Shakespeare, The Two Noble Kinsmen


Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war!

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;Or close the wall up with our English dead!In peace there’s nothing so becomes a manAs modest stillness and humility:But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


I am afeard there are few die well that die in battle, for how can they charitably dispose of anything when blood is their argument?

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness and humility; but when the blast of war blows in our ears, then imitate the action of the tiger; stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, disguise fair nature with hard-favor’d rage.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Let me have war, say I: it exceeds peace as far as day does night; it’s spritely, waking, audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy; mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more bastard children than war’s a destroyer of men.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


If we shadows have offended, Think but this, and all is mended, That you have but slumbered hereWhile these visions did appear.And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend:If you pardon, we will mend:And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luckNow to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue, We will make amends ere long;Else the Puck a liar call;So, good night unto you all.Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air, And more inconstant than the wind, who woos Even now the frozen bosom of the north, And, being anger’d, puffs away from thence, Turning his side to the dew-dropping south.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


…and then, in dreaming, / The clouds methought would open and show riches / Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked / I cried to dream again.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


For some must watch, while some must sleep So runs the world away

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was: man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was–there is no man can tell what. Methought I was, –and methought I had, –but man is but a patched fool, if he will offer to say what methought I had. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream: it shall be called Bottom’s Dream, because it hath no bottom…

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Thought is free.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


O hell! to choose love by another’s eye.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


More of your conversation would infect my brain.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


Don Pedro – (…)’In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.’Benedick – The savage bull may, but if ever the sensible Benedick bear it, pluck off the bull’s horns and set them in my forehead, and let me be vildly painted; and in such great letters as they writes, ‘Here is good horse for hire’, let them signify under my sign, ‘Here you may see Benedick the married man.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


– Where is Polonius?- In heaven; send hither to see: if your messenger find him not there, seek him i’ the other place yourself.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


There’s meaning in thy snores.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Dispute not with her: she is lunatic.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


If I be waspish, best beware my sting.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Make the doors upon a woman’s wit, and it will out at the casement;shut that, and ’twill out at the key-hole;stop that, ’twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney.

— William Shakespeare


From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive:They sparkle still the right Promethean fire;They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain and nourish all the world.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


DON PEDROCome, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick.BEATRICEIndeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for his single one: marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it.DON PEDROYou have put him down, lady, you have put him down.BEATRICESo I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Were kisses all the joys in bed, /One woman would another wed.

— William Shakespeare


Proper deformity shows not in the fiendSo horrid as in woman.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Why should their liberty than ours be more?

— William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors


For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


O! she doth teach the torches to burn bright It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear; Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.- Romeo –

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


The Devil hath powerTo assume a pleasing shape.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Friendship is constant in all other thingsSave in the office and affairs of love.Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues.Let every eye negotiate for itself, And trust no agent; for beauty is a witchAgainst whose charms faith melteth into blood.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you. . . .She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comesIn shape no bigger than an agate stoneOn the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomiAthwart men’s noses as they lie asleep.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


What is your substance, whereof are you made, That millions of strange shadows on you tend?Since everyone hath every one, one shade, And you, but one, can every shadow lend.Describe Adonis, and the counterfeitIs poorly imitated after you.On Helen’s cheek all art of beauty set, And you in Grecian tires are painted new.Speak of the spring and foison of the year;The one doth shadow of your beauty show, The other as your bounty doth appear, And you in every blessèd shape we know.In all external grace you have some part, But you like none, none you, for constant heart.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


The Brightness of her cheek would shame those stars as daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven would through the airy region stream so bright that birds would sing, and think it were not night.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than with honesty?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Look on beauty, And you shall see ’tis purchased by the weight;Which therein works a miracle in nature, Making them lightest that wear most of it:So are those crisped snaky golden locksWhich make such wanton gambols with the wind, Upon supposed fairness, often knownTo be the dowry of a second head, The skull that bred them in the sepulchre.Thus ornament is but the guiled shoreTo a most dangerous sea; the beauteous scarfVeiling an Indian beauty; in a word, The seeming truth which cunning times put onTo entrap the wisest.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Beauty itself doth of itself persuadeThe eyes of men without orator.

— William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece


In the old age black was not counted fair, Or if it were, it bore not beauty’s name.But now is black beauty’s successive heir, And beauty slandered with a bastard shame.For since each hand hath put on nature’s pow’r, Fairing the foul with art’s false borrowed face, Sweet beauty hath no name, no holy bow’r, But is profaned, if not lives in disgrace.Therefore my mistress’ eyes are raven black, Her eyes so suited, and they mourners seemAt such who, not born fair, no beauty lack, Sland’ring creation with a false esteem.  Yet so they mourn, becoming of their woe,   That every tongue says beauty should look so.

— William Shakespeare


What you doStill betters what is done. When you speak, sweet.I’ld have you do it ever: when you sing, I’ld have you buy and sell so, so give alms, Pray so; and, for the ordering your affairs, To sing them too: when you do dance, I wish youA wave o’ the sea, that you might ever doNothing but that; move still, still so, And own no other function: each your doing, So singular in each particular, Crowns what you are doing in the present deed, That all your acts are queens.

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.

— William Shakespeare


DESDEMONACome, how wouldst thou praise me? IAGO I am about it; but indeed my invention Comes from my pate as birdlime does from frieze; It plucks out brains and all: but my Muse labours, And thus she is deliver’d. If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit, The one’s for use, the other useth it. DESDEMONA Well praised! How if she be black and witty? IAGO If she be black, and thereto have a wit, She’ll find a white that shall her blackness fit. DESDEMONA Worse and worse. EMILIA How if fair and foolish? IAGO She never yet was foolish that was fair; For even her folly help’d her to an heir. DESDEMONA These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i’ the alehouse. What miserable praise hast thou for her that’s foul and foolish? IAGO There’s none so foul and foolish thereunto, But does foul pranks which fair and wise ones do.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


This look of thine will hurl my soul from heaven.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Not marble nor the gilded monumentsOf princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme, But you shall shine more bright in these contentsThan unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish time.When wasteful war shall statues overturnAnd broils roots out the work of masonry, Nor mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burnThe living record of your memory.’Gainst death and all-oblivious enmityShall you pace forth; your praise shall still find roomEven in the eyes of all posterityThat wear this world out to the ending doom.So, till judgement that yourself arise, You in this, and dwell in lovers eyes.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


So. Lie there, my art.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


My liege, and madam, to expostulateWhat majesty should be, what duty is, Why day is day, night night, and time is time, Were nothing but to waste night, day and time.Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I can’t talk, or I will throw up!

— William Shakespeare


Sound drums and trumpets! Farewell sour annoy! For here, I hope, begins our lasting joy.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 3


All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


We all are men, in our own natures frail, and capable of our flesh; few are angels.

— William Shakespeare, Henry VIII


Their manners are more gentle, kind, than of our generation you shall find.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


A peace is of the nature of a conquest; for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser.

— William Shakespeare


One fire burns out another’s burning, One pain is lessen’d by another’s anguish.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


If there were a sympathy in choice, War, death, or sickness, did lay siege to it, Making it momentary as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream, Brief as the lightning in the collied nightThat, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth, And ere a man hath power to say ‘Behold!’The jaws of darkness do devour it up;So quick bright things come to confusion.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


MARCUS ANDRONICUS: Now is a time to storm; why art thou still?TITUS ANDRONICUS: Ha, ha, ha!MARCUS ANDRONICUS: Why dost thou laugh? it fits not with this hour.TITUS ANDRONICUS: Why, I have not another tear to shed:

— William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus


When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, Thy head, thy sovereign, one that cares for thee, And for thy maintenance; commits his bodyTo painful labor, both by sea and land;To watch the night in storms, the day in cold, Whilst thou li’st warm at home, secure and safe;And craves no other tribute at thy handsBut love, fair looks, and true obedience-Too little payment for so great a debt.Such duty as the subject owes the prince, Even such a woman oweth to her husband;And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour, And no obedient to his honest will, What is she but a foul contending rebel, And graceless traitor to her loving lord?I asham’d that women are so simple‘To offer war where they should kneel for peace, Or seek for rule, supremacy, and sway, When they are bound to serve, love, and obey.Why are our bodies soft, and weak, and smooth, Unapt to toil and trouble in the world, But that our soft conditions, and our hearts, Should well agree with our external parts?

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Wooing, wedding, and repenting is as a Scotch jig, a measure, and a cinque-pace: the first suit is hot and hasty like a Scotch jig–and full as fantastical; the wedding, mannerly modest, as a measure, full of state and ancientry; and then comes repentance and with his bad legs falls into the cinque-pace faster and faster, till he sink into his grave.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


And too soon Marred are those so early Made.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


I’ll have no husband, if you be not he.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


A young man married is a man that’s marred.

— William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well


I will deny thee nothing: Whereon, I do beseech thee, grant me this, To leave me but a little to myself.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


I’ll follow this good man, and go with you;And, having sworn truth, ever will be true.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Now go with me and with this holy manInto the chantry by: there, before him, And underneath that consecrated roof, Plight me the full assurance of your faith.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Such a mad marriage never was before.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Lorenzo: In such a night stood Dido with a willow in her hand upon the wild sea-banks, and waft her love to come again to Carthage Jessica: In such a night Medea gathered the enchanted herbs that did renew old Aeson. Lorenzo: In such a night did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew, and with an unthrift love did run from Venice, as far as Belmont. Jessica: In such a night did young Lorenzo swear he lov’d her well, stealing her soul with many vows of faith, and ne’er a true one. Lorenzo: In such a night did pretty Jessica (like a little shrow) slander her love, and he forgave it her. Jessica: I would out-night you, did nobody come; but hark, I hear the footing of a man.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Tax not so bad a voice to slander music any more than once.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones and floods; since nought so stockish, hard and full of rage, but music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night and his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


ROMEOThere is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls, Doing more murders in this loathsome world, Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.Come, cordial and not poison, go with meTo Juliet’s grave; for there must I use thee.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls, Doing more murder in this loathsome world, Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Were I the Moor I would not be Iago.In following him I follow but myself;Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty, But seeming so for my peculiar end.For when my outward action doth demonstrateThe native act and figure of my heartIn compliment extern, ’tis not long afterBut I will wear my heart upon my sleeveFor daws to peck at. I am not what I am

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Where shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly ‘s done, when the battle ‘s lost and won

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Lovers and madmen have such seething brainsSuch shaping fantasies, that apprehendMore than cool reason ever comprehends.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Thou, my slave, As thou report’st thyself, was then her servant, And for thou wast a spirit too delicateTo act her earthy and abhorred commands, Refusing her grand hests, she did confine thee, By help of her more potent ministersAnd in her most unmitigable rage, Into a cloven pine, within which riftImprisoned thou didst painfully remainA dozen years; within which space she diedAnd left thee there, where thou didst vent thy groansAs fast as mill wheels strike.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


They do not love, that do not show their love.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


In Antiochus and his daughter you have heard of monstrous lust the due and just reward; In Pericles, his queen, and daughter, seen, Although assailed with fortune fierce and keen, Virtue preserved from fell destruction’s blast, Led on by heaven, and crowned with joy at last.

— William Shakespeare


No more light answers. Let our officersHave note what we purpose. I shall breakThe cause of our expedience to the QueenAnd get her leave to part. For not aloneThe death of Fulvia, with more urgent touches, Do strongly speak to us, but the letters tooOf many our contriving friends in RomePetition us at home. Sextus PompeiusHath given the dare to Caesar and commandsThe empire of the sea. Our slippery people, Whose love is never linked to the deserverTill his deserts are past, begin to throwPompey the Great and all his dignitiesUpon his son, who – high in name and power, Higher than both in blood and life – stands upFor the main soldier; whose quality, going on, The sides o’ th’ world may danger. Much is breedingWhich, like the courser’s hair, hath yet but lifeAnd not a serpent’s poison.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


It is excellent / To have a giant’s strenght / But it is tyrannous / To use it like a giant(Isabella)

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


For to be wise and love exceeds man’s might.

— William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida


The pow’r I have on you is to spare you / The malice towards you, to forgive you. Posthumus

— William Shakespeare, Cymbeline


As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition, oft got without merit and lost without deserving.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


O brave new world, That has such people in ’t!-Miranda

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


The abuse of greatness is when it disjoins remorse from power.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Macbeth:If we should fail?Lady Macbeth:We fail?But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we’ll not fail.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


He which hath no stomach to this fight, let him depart, his passport shall be made and crowns for convoy put into his purse. We would not die in that man’s company that fears his fellowship, to die with us.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


This is the very ecstasy of love, Whose violent property fordoes itselfAnd leads the will to desperate undertakingsAs oft as any passion under heavenThat does afflict our natures.

— William Shakespeare, ഹാംലെറ്റ് | Hamlet


My brain I’ll prove the female to my soul; my soul the father: and these two beget a generation of still-breeding thoughts, and these same thoughts people this little world.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Well, in that hit you miss. She’ll not be hitWith Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit, And, in strong proff of chastity well armed, From Love’s weak childish bow she lives uncharmed. She will not stay the siege of loving terms, Nor bide th’ encounter of assailing eyes, Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold.O, she is rich in beauty; only poorThat, when she dies, with dies her store.Act 1, Scene 1, lines 180-197

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


He eats nothing but doves, love, and that breeds hot blood, and hot blood beget hot thoughts, and hot thoughts beget hot deeds, and hot deeds is love.

— William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida


BOYETA mark! O, mark but that mark! A mark, says my lady!Let the mark have a prick in’t, to mete at, if it may be.MARIAWide o’ the bow hand! i’ faith, your hand is out.COSTARDIndeed, a’ must shoot nearer, or he’ll ne’er hit the clout.BOYETAn if my hand be out, then belike your hand is in.COSTARDThen will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.MARIACome, come, you talk greasily; your lips grow foul.COSTARDShe’s too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.BOYETI fear too much rubbing. Good night, my good owl.Exeunt BOYET and MARIA

— William Shakespeare


Silence is the herald of joy

— William Shakespeare


O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the marketplace.

— William Shakespeare


Have not we affections and desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls:Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing;’twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands;But he that filches from me my good nameRobs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


The tender spring upon thy tempting lipShows thee unripe; yet mayst thou well be tasted:Make use of time, let not advantage slip;Beauty within itself should not be wasted:Fair flowers that are not gather’d in their primeRot and consume themselves in little time.

— William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis


Refrain to-night;And that shall lend a kind of easinessTo the next abstinence, the next more easy;For use almost can change the stamp of nature, And either master the devil or throw him outWith wondrous potency.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.

— William Shakespeare


Then I defy you, stars!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Then the liars and swearers are fools, for there are liars and swearers enough to beat the honest men and hang up them.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


O that a man might knowThe end of this day’s business ere it come!But it sufficeth that the day will endAnd then the end is known.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


What we are is not all that we may become.

— William Shakespeare


Lord Polonius: What do you read, my lord? Hamlet: Words, words, words. Lord Polonius: What is the matter, my lord? Hamlet: Between who? Lord Polonius: I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Say a day without the ever.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


POLONIUS : My Lord, I will use them according to their desert.HAMLET : God’s bodykins man, better. Use every man after his desert, and who should ‘scape whipping? Use them after your own honour and dignity. The less they deserve, the more merit is in your bounty.

— William Shakespeare


That such a slave as this should wear a sword, Who wears no honesty. Such smiling rogues as these, Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwainWhich are too intrinse t’ unloose; smooth every passionThat in the natures of their lords rebel, Being oil to the fire, snow to the colder moods, Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaksWith every gale and vary of their mastersKnowing naught, like dogs, but following.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Men of few words are the best men.”(3.2.41)

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Suit the action to the word, theWord to the action.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


O, let my books be then the eloquenceAnd dumb presagers of my speaking breast;Who plead for love, and look for recompense, More than that tongue that more hath more express’d.O, learn to read what silent love hath writ:To hear with eyes belongs to love’s fine wit.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


…speak to me as to thy thinkingAs thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughtsThe worst of words…

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?Doctor: Not so sick, my lord, as she is troubled with thick-coming fancies that keep her from rest.Macbeth: Cure her of that! Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon her heart.Doctor: Therein the patient must minister to himself.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Oft have I heard that grief softens the mind, And makes it fearful and degenerate; Think therefore on revenge and cease to weep.

— William Shakespeare


There is nothing in the world so much like prayer as music is. ~William Shakespeare

— William Shakespeare


Whate’er I read to her. I’ll plead for youAs for my patron, stand you so assured, As firmly as yourself were in still place – Yea, and perhaps with more successful wordsThan you, unless you were a scholar, sir.O this learning, what a thing it is!

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


For trust not him that hath once broken faith

— William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 3


Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever, -One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Though with their high wrongs I am struck to th’ quick, Yet with my nobler reason ‘gainst my furyDo I take part.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all! Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall: Some run from brakes of ice, and answer none: And some condemned for a fault alone.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


If thou wilt leave me, do not leave me last, When other petty griefs have done their spite, But in the onset come: so shall I tasteAt first the very worst of fortune’s might;And other strains of woe, which now seem woe, Compar’d with loss of thee will not seem so.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


To move wild laughter in the throat of death? It cannot be, it is impossible: Mirth cannot move a soul in agony.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


This tune goes manly.Come, go we to the King. Our power is ready;Our lack is nothing but our leave. MacbethIs ripe for shaking, and the powers abovePut on their instruments. Receive what cheer you may.The night is long that never finds th

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


To weep is to make less the depth of grief.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 3


Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Seems, ” madam? Nay, it is; I know not “seems.”‘Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother, Nor customary suits of solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forced breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the eye, Nor the dejected ‘havior of the visage, Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief, That can denote me truly: these indeed seem, For they are actions that a man might play: But I have that within which passeth show; These but the trappings and the suits of woe.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Some grief shows much of love, But much of grief shows still some want of wit.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


When Rosencrantz asks Hamlet, “Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? You do surely bar the door upon your own liberty, if you deny your grief to your friends”(III, ii, 844-846), Hamlet responds, “Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me! You would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would pluck from my lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is much music, excellent voice, in this little organ, yet cannot you make it speak. ‘Sblood, do you think I am easier to be played on than a pipe? Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, you cannot play upon me.” (III, ii, 371-380)

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Have I thought long to see this morning’s face, And doth it give me such a sight as this?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


for my grief’s so greatThat no supporter but the huge firm earthCan hold it up: here I and sorrows sit;Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.(Constance, from King John, Act III, scene 1)

— William Shakespeare


My particular grief Is of so flood-gate and o’erbearing nature That it engluts and swallows other sorrows, And it is still itself.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Howl, howl, howl, howl! O, you are men of stones!

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Do not forever with thy vailed lidsSeek for thy noble father in the dust.Thou know’st ’tis common; all that lives must die, Passing though nature to eternity.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Each substance of grief hath twenty shadows, which shows like grief itself, but is not so; or sorrow’s eye, glazed with blinding tears, divides one thing entire to many objects: like perspectives which, rightly gaz’d upon, show nothing but confusion:

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Is there no pity sitting in the clouds that sees into the bottom of my grief?

— William Shakespeare


The grief that does not speak whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Let us not burthen our remembrance withA heaviness that’s gone.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


I have a soul of leadSo stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Not a whit, we defy augury: there’s a specialprovidence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will benow; if it be not now, yet it will come: thereadiness is all.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


​Sebastian: By your patience, no. My stars shine darkly over me; the malignancy of my fate might, perhaps, distemper yours; therefore I shall carve of you your leave that I may bear my evils alone. It were a bad recompense for your love to lay any of them on you.

— William Shakespeare


Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upwardTo what they were before.

— William Shakespeare


But I am bound upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears do scald like moulten lead.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly:Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:Then, heigh-ho, the holly!This life is most jolly.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


HIPPOLYTABut all the story of the night told over, And all their minds transfigured so together, More witnesseth than fancy’s imagesAnd grows to something of great constancy, But, howsoever, strange and admirable.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Men should be what they seem.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


He reads much;He is a great observer and he looksQuite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music;Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sortAs if he mock’d himself and scorn’d his spiritThat could be moved to smile at any thing.Such men as he be never at heart’s easeWhiles they behold a greater than themselves, And therefore are they very dangerous.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Small herbs have grace, great weeds to grow apace.

— William Shakespeare


Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone, besmear’d with sluttish time. When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils root out the work of masonry, Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burnThe living record of your memory. ‘Gainst death and all-oblivious enmityShall you pace forth; your praise shall still find roomEven in the eyes of all posterity That wear this world out to the ending doom.So, till the judgment that yourself arise, You live in this, and dwell in lovers’ eyes.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


This rough magicI here abjure, and, when I have requiredSome heavenly music, which even now I do, To work mine end upon their senses thatThis airy charm is for, I’ll break my staff, Bury it certain fathoms in the earth, And deeper than did ever plummet soundI’ll drown my book.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


O, she’s warm!If this be magic, let it be an artLawful as eating.

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


And now about the cauldron singLike elves and fairies in a ring, Enchanting all that you put in.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


If this be magic, let it be an art lawful as eating.

— William Shakespeare


And Sir, it is no little thing to make mine eyes to sweat compassion.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


I must be cruel only to be kind;Thus bad begins, and worse remains behind.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


He is as full of valor as of kindness. Princely in both.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Travellers ne’er did lie, Though fools at home condemn ’em.-Antonio

— William Shakespeare


They are but beggars that can count their worth.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


And yet for aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit with too much as they that starve with nothing. It is no mean happiness, therefore, to be seated in the mean. Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Poor and content is rich, and rich enough;But riches fineless is as poor as winterTo him that ever fears he shall be poor;–Good heaven, the souls of all my tribe defendFrom jealousy!

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Fortune, that arrant whore, Ne’er turns the key to th’poor.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano!

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


How now, spirit, whither wander you?

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Readers’ Edition


Well, I must do’t. Away, my disposition, and possess me Some harlot’s spirit! My throat of war be turn’d, Which quier’d with my drum, into a pipe Small as an eunuch, or the virgin voice That babies lull asleep! The smiles of knaves Tent in my cheeks, and schoolboys’ tears take up The glasses of my sight! A beggar’s tongue Make motion through my lips, and my arm’d knees, Who bow’d but in my stirrup, bend like his That hath receiv’d an alms! I will not do’t, Lest I surcease to honor mine own truth, And by my body’s action teach my mind A most inherent baseness.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


I am not gamesome: I do lack some partof that quick spirit that is in Antony.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


What’s in a name?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


What’s past is prologue.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Things without all remedy should be without regard: what’s done is done.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


What’s done, is done

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


… one fire burns out another’s burning.One pain is lessened by another’s anguish. -Romeo & Juliet

— William Shakespeare


Alas, my lord, your wisdom is consumed in confidence.

— William Shakespeare


Oh, that this too, too sullied flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew, Or that the Everlasting had not fixed. His canon ‘gainst self-slaughter!

— William Shakespeare


There’s a great spirit gone! Thus did I desire it.What our contempts doth often hurl from us, We wish it ours again. The present pleasure, By revolution lowering, does becomeThe opposite of itself. She’s good, being gone.The hand could pluck her back that shoved her on.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Mum, mum, He that keeps nor crust nor crumb, Weary of all, shall want some.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Thou art a votary to fond desire

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Tis best to weigh the enemy more mighty than he seems.

— William Shakespeare


Mark it, nuncle.Have more than thou showest, Speak less than thou knowest, Lend less than thou owest, Ride more than thou goest, Learn more than thou trowest, Set less than thou throwest, Leave thy drink and thy whoreAnd keep in-a-door, And thou shalt have moreThan two tens to a score.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


But hear thee, Gratiano:Thou art too wild, too rude, and bold of voice – Parts that become thee happily enough, And in such eyes as ours appear no faults, But where thou art not known, why, there they show Something too liberal.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


He’s mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse’s health, a boy’s love, or a whore’s oath.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin as self-neglecting.

— William Shakespeare


I should think this a gull, but that the white-bearded fellow speaks it; knavery cannot, sure, hide himself in such reverence.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


All dark and comfortless.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Each new mornNew widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrowsStrike heaven on the face, that it resoundsAs if it felt with Scotland, and yelled outLike syllable of dolor.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell.Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace, Yet Grace must still look so.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Virtue and genuine graces in themselves speak what no words can utter.

— William Shakespeare


Oh, I am fortune’s fool!

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Affliction is enamoured of thy parts, And thou art wedded to calamity.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


There’s a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow worldLike a Colossus, and we petty menWalk under his huge legs and peep aboutTo find ourselves dishonorable graves.Men at some time are masters of their fates.The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our starsBut in ourselves, that we are underlings.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


An admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition on the charge of a star!

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


..What our contempt often hurls from us, We wish it our again; the present pleasure, By revolution lowering, does becomeThe opposite of itself..

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


In thy foul throat thou liest.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


Ay, that I had not done a thousand more.Even now I curse the day—and yet, I think, Few come within the compass of my curse, —Wherein I did not some notorious ill, As kill a man, or else devise his death, Ravish a maid, or plot the way to do it, Accuse some innocent and forswear myself, Set deadly enmity between two friends, Make poor men’s cattle break their necks;Set fire on barns and hay-stacks in the night, And bid the owners quench them with their tears.Oft have I digg’d up dead men from their graves, And set them upright at their dear friends’ doors, Even when their sorrows almost were forgot;And on their skins, as on the bark of trees, Have with my knife carved in Roman letters, ‘Let not your sorrow die, though I am dead.’Tut, I have done a thousand dreadful thingsAs willingly as one would kill a fly, And nothing grieves me heartily indeedBut that I cannot do ten thousand more.

— William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus


Those lips that Love’s own hand did makeBreathed forth the sound that said, ‘I hate’To me that languished for her sake, But, when she saw my woeful state, Straight in her heart did mercy come, Chiding that tongue that ever sweetWas used in giving gentle doom, And taught it thus anew to greet:’I hate, ‘ she altered with an endThat followed it as gentle dayDoth follow night, who like a fiendFrom Heaven to Hell is flown away.’I hate’ from hate away she threwAnd saved my life, saying ‘not you’.

— William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and A Lover’s Complaint


Never durst a poet touch a pen to writeUntil his ink was tempered with love’s sighs.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


GLOUCESTERNow, good sir, what are you?EDGARA most poor man made tame to fortune’s blows, Who by the art of known and feeling sorrowsAm pregnant to good pity.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Experience is by industry achiev’d, And perfected by the swift course of time.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


Fie, fie upon her! There’s language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out at every joint and motive of her body.

— William Shakespeare


It were a grief so brief to part with thee.Farewell.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


A sad tale’s best for winter: I have one of sprites and goblins.

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


Tis torture, and not mercy. Heaven is here Where Juliet lives, and every cat and dog And little mouse, every unworthy thing, Live here in heaven and may look on her, But Romeo may not.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet: Plain Text: The Graphic Novel


To be or not to be that is the question.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Men in rage strike those that wish them best.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


By heaven, I’ll make a ghost of him that lets me.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Let us revenge this withour pikes, ere we become rakes: for the gods know Ispeak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


That in the captain’s but a choleric word, Which in the soldier is flat blasphemy.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


I understand a fury in your wordsBut not your words.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a taleTold by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form, in moving, how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Olivia: What’s a drunken man like, fool?Feste: Like a drowned man, a fool, and a madman: one draught above heat makes him a fool; the second mads him; and a third drowns him.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Thou art the thing itself: unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor bare, forked animal as thou art.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


What a piece of work is man!

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


My dull brain was wrought with things forgotten.

— William Shakespeare


Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still, Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love.Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O any thing, of nothing first create!O heavy lightness! Serious vanity!Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!This love feel I, that feel no love in this.Dost thou not laugh?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


My only love sprung from my only hate.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Love me or hate me, both are in my favour. If you love me, I’ll always be in your heart… If you hate me, I’ll always be in your mind.

— William Shakespeare


Love me or hate me, both are in my favor. If you love me, I’ll always be in your heart. If you hate me, I’ll always be in your mind.

— William Shakespeare


Love is my sin, and thy dear virtue hate, Hate of my sin, grounded on sinful loving

— William Shakespeare, Sonnets


I had as lief have the foppery of freedom as the morality of imprisonment.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


She’s beautiful, and therefore to be wooed; She is a woman, therefore to be won.

— William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1


Love is not love which alters it when alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove: O no! It is an ever fixed mark that looks on tempests and is never shaken; it is the star to every wandering bark whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken. Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks within his bending sickle’s compass come: Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, but bears it out, even to the edge of

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


I might call him. A thing divine, for nothing natural. I ever saw so noble.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


I know you all, and will awhile uphold the unyoked humour of your idleness . . .

— William Shakespeare


Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


To be honest, as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


No legacy is so rich as honesty.

— William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well


Though I am not naturally honest, I am sometimes so by chance.

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


What a fool honesty is.

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


To be honest, as this world goes is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.Hamlet Act II, Scene II Lines 178-179

— William Shakespeare


Every man has his fault, and honesty is his.- Lucullus (Act III, scene 1)

— William Shakespeare


Ay, sir;to be honest, as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I do believe you think what now you speak, But what we do determine oft we break.Purpose is but the slave to memory, Of violent birth, but poor validity, Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree, But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.Most necessary ’tis that we forgetTo pay ourselves what to ourselves is debt.What to ourselves in passion we propose, The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.

— William Shakespeare


For your sake, jewel, I am glad at soul I have no other child;For thy escape would teach me tyranny, To hang clogs on them.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


The truth you speak doth lack some gentlenessAnd time to speak it in. You rub the soreWhen you should bring the plaster.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


It is not enough to speak but to speak truth

— William Shakespeare


O! Learn to read what silent love hath writ:to hear with eyes belongs to love’s fine wit.

— William Shakespeare


But then I sigh, with a piece of ScriptureTell them that God bids us to do evil for good; And thus I clothe my naked villanyWith odd old ends stolen out of Holy Writ;And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


We know what we are, but not what we may be.

— William Shakespeare


What’s in a name? that which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


He that commends me to mine own contentCommends me to the thing I cannot get.I to the world am like a drop of waterThat in the ocean seeks another drop, Who, falling there to find his fellow forth, Unseen, inquisitive, confounds himself:So I, to find a mother and a brother, In quest of them, unhappy, lose myself.

— William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors


Be as thou wast wont to be.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Be as thou wast wont to be.See as thou wast wont to see.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Cucullus non facit monachum; that’s as much to say, as I wear not motley in my brain.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Journeys end in lovers meeting.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Doth with their death bury their parents’ strife. . . . O, I am fortune’s fool! . . . Then I defy you, stars.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Beshrew me but I love her heartily, For she is wise, if I can judge of her, And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true, And true she is, as she hath proved herself: And therefore like herself, wise, fair, and true, Shall she be placed in my constant soul.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Parting is such sweet sorrow

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Good wombs have borne bad sons.”– (Miranda, I:2)

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


The most peaceable way for you, if you do take a thief, is, to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.

— William Shakespeare


I cannot live to hear the news from England.But I do prophesy th’ election lightsOn Fortinbras; he has my dying voice.So tell him, with th’ occurents, more and less, Which have solicited – the rest is silence.

— William Shakespeare


Fit to govern? No, not fit to live.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law. – Romeo

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Alack, sir, no; her passions are made of nothing but the finest part of pure love. We cannot call her winds and waters sighs and tears; they are greater storms and tempests than almanacs can report: this cannot be cunning in her; if it be, she makes a shower of rain as well as Jove.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


For it falls outThat what we have we prize not to the worthWhiles we enjoy it, but being lacked and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we findThe virtue that possession would not show usWhile it was ours.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


For this new-married man approaching here, Whose salt imagination yet hath wrong’dYour well defended honour, you must pardonFor Mariana’s sake: but as he adjudged your brother, –Being criminal, in double violationOf sacred chastity and of promise-breachThereon dependent, for your brother’s life, –The very mercy of the law cries outMost audible, even from his proper tongue, ‘An Angelo for Claudio, death for death!’Haste still pays haste, and leisure answers leisure;Like doth quit like, and MEASURE still FOR MEASURE

— William Shakespeare


I beg for justice, which you, Prince, must give. Romeo killed Tybalt; Romeo must not live.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Hark, villains! I will grind your bones to dust. (Act V, Scene 2, 2503)

— William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus


The gods are just, and of our pleasant vicesMake instruments to plague us.

— William Shakespeare


Few love to hear the sins they love to act.

— William Shakespeare, Pericles


Uncertain way of gain. But I am inSo far in blood that sin will pluck on sin.Tear-falling pity dwells not in this eye.

— William Shakespeare


Antioch, farewell! for wisdom sees, those men blush not in actions blacker than the night, will ‘schew no course to keep them from the light. One sin, I know, another doth provoke; Murder’s as near to lust as flame to smoke. Poison and treason are the hands of sin; Ay, and the targets to put off the shame. Then, lest my life be cropped to keep you clear, By flight I’ll shun the danger which I fear.

— William Shakespeare


Who knows himself a braggart, let him fear this, for it will come to pass that every braggart shall be found an ass.

— William Shakespeare, The Complete Works


If I turn mine eyes upon myself, I find myself a traitor with the rest;

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


All things are ready, if our mind be so.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


The robb’d that smiles, steals something from the thief.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


I rather would entreat thy companyTo see the wonders of the world abroadThan, living dully sluggardiz’d at home, Wear out thy youth with shapeless idleness.

— William Shakespeare


Golden lads and girls all must, like chimmney-sweepers, come to dust.

— William Shakespeare


CLEOPATRA: My salad days, When I was green in judgment: cold in blood, To say as I said then! But, come, away;Get me ink and paper:He shall have every day a several greeting, Or I’ll unpeople Egypt.

— William Shakespeare


We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


such wanton, wild, and usual slips/ As are companions noted and most known/ To youth and liberty.

— William Shakespeare


Orsino: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and won, Than women’s are. …For women are as roses, whose fair flow’rBeing once display’d doth fall that very hour.Viola: And so they are; alas, that they are so!To die, even when they to perfection grow!

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


There’s small choice in rotten apples.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


He that is proud eats up himself: pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle.

— William Shakespeare


. . . I will not be sworn, but love may trans-form me to an oyster, but, I’ll take my oath on it, till hehave made an oyster of me, he shall never make me sucha fool.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Live by the words of intelligence endured..F@&$ IT!

— William Shakespeare


Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


She moves me not, or not removes at least affection’s edge in me.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Our reasons are not prophets When oft our fancies are.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Noble Kinsmen


Were such things here as we do speak about?Or have we eaten on the insane rootThat takes the reason prisoner?

— William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Macbeth. by William Shakespear. to Which Are Added All the Original Songs.


… and yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days…

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


… reason andlove keep little company together now-a-days…

— William Shakespeare


The expedition of my violent love outrun the pauser, reason.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The blessedness of being little!!!

— William Shakespeare


Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks within his bending sickle’s compass come.

— William Shakespeare, Love Poems and Sonnets


In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, For they in thee a thousand errors note; But ’tis my heart that loves what they despise, Who in despite of view is pleased to dote

— William Shakespeare


But thought’s the slave of life, and life time’s fool;And time, that takes survey of all the world, Must have a stop. O, I could prophesy, But that the earthy and cold hand of deathLies on my tongue

— William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1


silence is not a langauge, its a weapon to make your dear one to feel

— William Shakespeare


The time approachesThat will with due decision make us knowWhat we shall say we have and what we owe.Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate, But certain issue strokes must arbitrate;Towards which, advance th

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord?Or to the dreadful summit of the cliffThat beetles o’er his base into the sea, And there assume some other horrible formWhich might deprive your sovereignty of reasonAnd draw you into madness? Think of it.[The very place puts toys of desperation, Without more motive, into every brainThat looks so many fathoms to the seaAnd hears it roar beneath.]

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


The skies are painted with unnumber’d sparks, They are all fire and every one doth shine

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


There’s not the smallest orb which thou behold’stBut in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring [making music] to the young-eyed cherubins; Such harmony is in immortal souls, But whilst this muddy vesture of decayDoth grossly close us in, we cannot hear it.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Care keeps his watch in every old man’s eye, And where care lodges, sleep will never lie.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


O Mistress mine, where are you roaming?O, stay and hear; your true love’s coming, That can sing both high and low:Trip no further, pretty sweeting;Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man’s son doth know.What is love? ‘Tis not hereafter;Present mirth hath present laughter;What’s to come is still unsure:In delay there lies not plenty;Then, come kiss me, sweet and twenty, Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

— William Shakespeare


If I were to kiss you then go to hell, I would. So then I can brag with the devils I saw heaven without ever entering it.

— William Shakespeare


turn him into stars and form a constellation in his image. His face will make the heavens so beautiful that the world will fall in love with the night and forget about the garish sun.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scornThe power of man, for none of woman bornShall harm Macbeth.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


To be thus is nothing, but to be safely thus…

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Sometime [Queen Mab] driveth o’er a soldier’s neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep; and then anonDrums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes, And being thus frighted, swears a prayer or twoAnd sleeps again

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Love is not loveWhich alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove.O no, it is an ever-fixed markThat looks on tempests and is never shaken;It is the star to every wand’ring bark, Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be t

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Sleep that knits up the raveled sleave of care, The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Shake off this downy sleep, death’s counterfeit, And look on death itself!

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The death of each days life

— William Shakespeare


What, all so soon asleep! I wish mine eyesWould, with themselves, shut up my thoughts…

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Thy best of rest is sleep, And that thou oft provok’st; yet grossly fear’stThy death, which is no more.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


My story being done, She gave me for my pains a world of sighs:She swore, ––in faith, twas strange, ’twas passing strange;’Twas pitiful, ’twas wondrous pitiful:She wish’d she had not heard it, yet she wish’dThat heaven had made her such a man: she thank’d me, And bade me, if I had a friend that lov’d her, I should but teach him how to tell my story.And that would woo her.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


…and what’s his reason? I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us; do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, revenge! The villainy you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Mislike me not for my complexion, The shadowed livery of the burnished sun, To whom I am a neighbor and near bred.Bring me the fairest creature northward born, Where Phoebus’ fire scarce thaws the icicles, And let us make incision for your loveTo prove whose blood is reddest, his or mine.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in battle, shall join together at the latter day and cry all ‘We died at such a place;’ some swearing, some crying for a surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left. I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle; for how can they charitably dispose of anything, when blood is their argument? Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; whom to disobey were against all proportion of subjection.[Henry V, Act IV Scene I]

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


From too much liberty, my Lucio, libertyAs surfeit is the father of much fast, So every scope of the immoderate useTurns to restraint. Our natures do pursue, -Like rats that ravin down their proper bane, – A thirsty evil; and when we drink we die.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


PORTERThis is a lot of knocking! Come to think of it, if a man were in charge of opening the gates of hell to let people in, he would have to turn the key a lot.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently abeast!

— William Shakespeare, Othello and the Tragedy of Mariam


Nought’s had, all’s spent, where our desire is got without content.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


He stopped the flyersAnd by his rare example made the cowardTurn terror into sport. As weeds beforeA vessel under sail, so men obeyedAnd fell below his stem. His sword, Death’s stamp, Where it did mark, it took; from face to footHe was a thing of blood, whose every motionWas timed with dying cries. Alone he enteredThe mortal gate o’ th’ city, which he paintedWith shunless destiny; aidless came offAnd with a sudden reinforcement struckCorioles like a planet. Now all’s his, When by and by the dim of war gan pierceHis ready sense; then straight his doubled spiritRequickened what in flesh was fatigate, And to the battle came he, where he didRun reeking o’er the lives of men as if’Twere a perpetual spoil; and till we calledBoth field and city ours, he never stoodTo ease his breast with panting.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful.

— William Shakespeare


O, that’s a brave man! He writes brave verses, speaks brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


O, that’s a brave man! He writes brave versrs, speaks brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Sweet are the uses of adversityWhich, like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Sweet are the uses of adversity.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Sweet are the uses of adversity, Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head;And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in every thing.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


The shadow of my sorrow. Let’s see, ’tis very true. My griefs lie all within and these external manners of laments are mere shadows to the unseen grief which swells with silence in the tortured soul.There lies the substance.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


For sorrow ends not, when it seemeth done.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


I’ll read enoughWhen I do see the very book indeedWhere all my sins are writ, and that’s myself.Give me that glass and therein will I read.No deeper wrinkles yet? Hath sorrow struckSo many blows upon this face of mineAnd made no deeper wounds?O flattering glass, Like to my followers in prosperityThou dost beguile me!

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Frailty, thy name is woman!—A little month, or ere those shoes were oldWith which she follow’d my poor father’s body, Like Niobe, all tears:—

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Lord, what fools these mortals be!

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


DESDEMONA: I hope my noble lord esteems me honest.OTHELLO: Oh, ay, as summer flies are in the shambles, That quicken even with blowing. O thou weed, Who art so lovely fair and smell’st so sweetThat the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst ne’er been born!DESDEMONA: Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?OTHELLO: Was this fair paper, this most goodly book, Made to write “whore” upon?

— William Shakespeare, Othello


CASSIO: Dost thou hear, my honest friend?CLOWN: No, I hear not your honest friend, I hear you.CASSIO: Prithee, keep up thy quillets.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Sir, he hath not fed of the dainties that are bred in a book; He hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink; his intellect is not replenished; he is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts… (Act IV, Scene II)

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


DEMETRIUSRelent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yieldThy crazed title to my certain right.LYSANDERYou have her father’s love, Demetrius;Let me have Hermia’s: do you marry him.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


QUINCEFrancis Flute, the bellows-mender.FLUTEHere, Peter Quince.QUINCEFlute, you must take Thisby on you.FLUTEWhat is Thisby? a wandering knight?QUINCEIt is the lady that Pyramus must love.FLUTENay, faith, let me not play a woman; I have a beard coming.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Either to die the death or to abjureFor ever the society of men.Therefore, fair Hermia, question your desires;Know of your youth, examine well your blood, Whether, if you yield not to your father’s choice, You can endure the livery of a nun, For aye to be in shady cloister mew’d, To live a barren sister all your life, Chanting faint hymns to the cold fruitless moon.Thrice-blessed they that master so their blood, To undergo such maiden pilgrimage;But earthlier happy is the rose distill’d, Than that which withering on the virgin thornGrows, lives and dies in single blessedness.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Our nearness to the king in love is nearness to those who love not the king.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Deal mildly with his youth; for young hot colts, being rag’s, do rage the more.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


The art of our necessities is strangeThat can make vile things precious.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


ROMEO :’Tis torture and not mercy. Heaven is here, Where Juliet lives, and every cat and dogAnd little mouse, every unworthy thing, Live here in heaven and may look on her, But Romeo may not. More validity, More honorable state, more courtship livesIn carrion flies than Romeo. They may seizeOn the white wonder of dear Juliet’s handAnd steal immortal blessing from her lips, Who even in pure and vestal modesty, Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin.But Romeo may not. He is banishèd.Flies may do this, but I from this must fly.They are free men, but I am banishèd.And sayst thou yet that exile is not death?Hadst thou no poison mixed, no sharp-ground knife, No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean, But “banishèd” to kill me?—“Banishèd”!O Friar, the damnèd use that word in hell.Howling attends it. How hast thou the heart, Being a divine, a ghostly confessor, A sin-absolver, and my friend professed, To mangle me with that word “banishèd”?

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Let every man be master of his time.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?”. – (Act III, scene I).

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 2


Confusion now hath made his masterpiece.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Yet she must die, else she’ll betray more men.Put out the light, and then put out the light:If I quench thee, thou flaming minister, I can again thy former light restore, Should I repent me: but once put out thy light, Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature, I know not where is that Promethean heatThat can thy light relume.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Come, sir, come, I’ll wrestle with you in my strength of love.Look, here I have you, thus I let you go, And give you to the gods.

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Love is not love which alters when it alterations finds. Sonnet 116

— William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and A Lover’s Complaint


Foul cankering rust the hidden treasure frets, but gold that’s put to use more gold begets.

— William Shakespeare


So oft it chances in particular menThat for some vicious mole of nature inthem—As in their birth (wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin), By the o’ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts ofreason, Or by some habit that too much o’erleavensThe form of plausive manners—that thesemen, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature’s livery or fortune’s star, Their virtues else (be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo)Shall in the general censure take corruptionFrom that particular fault. The dram of evilDoth all the noble substance of a doubtTo his own scandal.

— William Shakespeare


I charge thee, fling away ambition. By that sin fell the angels.

— William Shakespeare, Henry VIII


I have no spurTo prick the sides of my intent, but onlyVaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itselfAnd falls on the other.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


I thrice presented him a kingly crown. Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Verily, I swear, ’tis better to be lowly born, and range with humble livers in content, than to be perk’d up in a glistering grief, and wear a golden sorrow.

— William Shakespeare, Henry VIII


Ambition should be made from sterner stuff.

— William Shakespeare


The prince of darkness is a gentleman!

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Look, he’s winding up the watch of his wit; by and by it will strike.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Our doubts are traitors, and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Doubt thou the stars are fire Doubt thou the sun doth moveDoubt truth to be a liar But never doubt I love

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Our doubts are traitors, and make us loose the good that we oft might win, by fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare


The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Shall we their fond pageant see?Lord, what fools these mortals be!

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


His jest shall savour but a shallow wit, when thousands more weep than did laugh it.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


To hell, allegiance! Vows, to the blackest devil!Conscience and grace, to the profoundest pit!I dare damnation

— William Shakespeare


At this hourLie at my mercy all mine enemies.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Hot from hell. Caesar’s spirit raging in revenge. Cry, havoc! And let slip the dogs of war.

— William Shakespeare


I’ll find a day to massacre them allAnd raze their faction and their family, The cruel father and his traitorous sons, To whom I sued for my dear son’s life, And make them know what ’tis to let a queenKneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.

— William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus


Thou calledst me a dog before thou hadst a cause, But since I am a dog, beware my fangs.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


But virtue, as it never will be moved, Though lewdness court it in a shape of heaven, So lust, though to a radiant angel linked, Will sate itself in a celestial bedAnd prey on garbage.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


When the devout religion of mine eyeMaintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires, And these, who, often drowned, could never die, Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars!One fairer than my love? The all-seeing sunNe’er saw her match since first the world begun.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


The single and peculiar mind is boundWith all the strength and armor of the mindTo keep itself from noyance, but much moreThat spirit upon whose weal depends and restsThe lives of many. The cess of majestyDies not alone, but like a gulf doth drawWhat’s near it with it; or it is a massy wheelFixed on the summit of the highest mount, To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser thingsAre mortised and adjoined, which, when it falls, Each small annexment, petty consequence, Attends the boist’rous ruin. Never aloneDid the king sigh, but with a general groan.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Here come the lovers, full of joy and mirth.— Joy, gentle friends! joy and fresh days of love Accompany your hearts!

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


The native hue of resolution is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought; and enterprises of great pitch and moment, With this regard, their currents turn awry, and lose the name of action.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


LEAR: …yet you see how this world goes.GLOS.: I see it feelingly.

— William Shakespeare


Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell.

— William Shakespeare


To die, to sleep – To sleep, perchance to dream – ay, there’s the rub, For in this sleep of death what dreams may come…

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


More are men’s ends marked than their lives before.The setting sun, the music at the close, As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last, Writ in remembrance more than things long past.

— William Shakespeare


We defy augury. There is special providence inthe fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come; if it be not tocome, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come—thereadiness is all. Since no man, of aught he leaves, knows what is’tto leave betimes, let be. (Hamlet 5.2.217-224)

— William Shakespeare


I will have thee, as our rarer monsters are, painted upon a pole, and underwrit: “Here you may see the tyrant, Macbeth

— William Shakespeare


Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of manThat function is smothered in surmise, And nothing is but what is not.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


How stand I, then, That have a father killed, a mother stained, Excitements of my reason and my blood, And let all sleep, while to my shame I seeThe imminent death of twenty thousand menThat for a fantasy and trick of fameGo to their graves like beds, fight for a plotWhereon the numbers cannot try the cause, Which is not tomb enough and continentTo hide the slain? O, from this time forthMy thoughts be bloody or be nothing

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


Out of my sight! Thou dost infect mine eyes.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Beshrew your eyes, They have o’erlook’d me and divided me;One half of me is yours, the other half yours, Mine own, I would say; but if mine, then yours, And so all yours.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Then must you speakOf one that loved not wisely but too well, Of one not easily jealous but, being wrought, Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand, Like the base Indian, threw a pearl awayRicher than all his tribe; of one whose subdued eyes, Albeit unused to the melting mood, Drop tears as fast as the Arabian treesTheir medicinable gum. Set you down this, And say besides that in Aleppo once, Where a malignant and a turbaned TurkBeat a Venetian and traduced the state, I took by th’ throat the circumcised dogAnd smote him thus.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


To die is to be a counterfeit, for he is but the counterfeit of a man who hath not the life of a man; but to counterfeit dying when a man thereby liveth is to be no counterfeit, but the true and perfect image of life indeed.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1


So full of artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


I would forget it fain, But oh, it presses to my memory, Like damnèd guilty deeds to sinners’ minds.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Out, damned spot! out, I say!

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?Beatrice: Is it possible disdain should die while she hathsuch meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick?

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Nor shall this peace sleep with her; but as whenThe bird of wonder dies, the maiden phoenix, Her ashes new-create another heirAs great in admiration as herself.

— William Shakespeare, Henry VIII


BOTTOMThere are things in this comedy of Pyramus and Thisby that will never please. First, Pyramus must draw a sword to kill himself; which the ladiescannot abide. How answer you that?SNOUTBy’r lakin, a parlous fear.STARVELINGI believe we must leave the killing out, when all is done.BOTTOMNot a whit: I have a device to make all well.Write me a prologue; and let the prologue seem tosay, we will do no harm with our swords, and thatPyramus is not killed indeed; and, for the morebetter assurance, tell them that I, Pyramus, am notPyramus, but Bottom the weaver: this will put themout of fear.QUINCEWell, we will have such a prologue; and it shall bewritten in eight and six.BOTTOMNo, make it two more; let it be written in eight and eight.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


They met me in the day of success: and I havelearned by the perfectest report, they have more inthem than mortal knowledge. When I burned in desireto question them further, they made themselves air, into which they vanished. Whiles I stood rapt inthe wonder of it, came missives from the king, whoall-hailed me ‘Thane of Cawdor;’ by which title, before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referredme to the coming on of time, with ‘Hail, king thatshalt be!’ This have I thought good to deliverthee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thoumightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by beingignorant of what greatness is promised thee. Lay itto thy heart, and farewell.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Not I; I must be found;My parts, my title, and my perfect soul, Shall manifest me rightly.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


He hath always but slightly, known himself…King Lear

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


OH ROMEO. THOU ART ROMEO. WILL YOU MARRY ME. THOU ART ROMEO.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard, A serpent stung me; so the whole ear of DenmarkIs by a forged process of my deathRankly abused: but know, thou noble youth, The serpent that did sting thy father’s lifeNow wears his crown.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


As I love the name of honour more than I fear death.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


He was a man, take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


But if it be a sin to covet honour, I am the most offending soul alive.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Mine honor is my life; both grow in one.Take honor from me, and my life is done.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


What is honour? a word. What is in that word honour? what is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o’ Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1


Stars hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires: The eyes wink at the hand; yet let that be which the eye fears, when it is done, to see

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Time shall unfold what pleated cunning hides: Who cover faults, at last shame them derides.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


I would not put a thief in my mouth to steal my brains.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


Come what come may, time and the hour run through the roughest day.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Young men’s love then lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.

— William Shakespeare


She gave me for my pains a world of sighs.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Finish, good lady; the bright day is done, And we are for the Dark. (Act 5, Scene 2)

— William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra


Receive what cheer you may. The night is long that never finds the day.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, which still we thank as love.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Nothing in his life became him like leaving it.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


It would cost you a groaning to take off my edge.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Mistrust of good success hath done this deed.O hateful error, Melancholy’s child, Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of menThe things that are not? O Error, soon concieved, Thou never com’st unto a happy birth, But kill’st the mother that engendered thee.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world.

— William Shakespeare


Had he not resembled My father as he slept I had done’t!” Macbeth

— William Shakespeare


How now! Here’s the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.” Lady Macbeth

— William Shakespeare


Unsex me here and fill me from crown to toe full of direst cruelty That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose.” Macbeth

— William Shakespeare


Sir, I love you more than words can wield the matter; dearer than eye-sight, space, and liberty, beyond waht can be valued, rich or rare; no less than life, with grace, health, beauty, honor; as much as child e’er loved, or father found; a love that makes breath poor, and speech unable; beyond all manner of so much I love you.

— William Shakespeare


I profess myself an enemy to all other joys, which the most precious square of sense possesses, and find I am alone felicitate in your dear highness love.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


If e’er again I meet him beard to beard, he’s mine or I am his.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so. Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


So our virtuesLie in the interpretation of the time:And power, unto itself most commendable, Hath not a tomb so evident as a chairTo extol what it hath done.One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thyeyes—and moreover, I will go with thee to thy uncle’s.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


What win I, if I gain the thing I seek?A dream, a breath, a froth of fleeting joy.Who buys a minute’s mirth to wail a week?Or sells eternity to get a toy?For one sweet grape who will the vine destroy?Or what fond beggar, but to touch the crown, Would with the sceptre straight be strucken down?

— William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece


Those that much covet are with gain so fond, For what they have not, that which they possessThey scatter and unloose it from their bond, And so, by hoping more, they have but less;Or, gaining more, the profit of excessIs but to surfeit, and such griefs sustain, That they prove bankrupt in this poor-rich gain.

— William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece


Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.

— William Shakespeare


Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time;And all our yesterdays have lighted foolsThe way to dusty death.- Macbeth Act V, Scene V

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The quality of mercy is not strain’d, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heavenUpon the place beneath: it is twice blest;It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:’Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomesThe throned monarch better than his crown;His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;But mercy is above this sceptred sway;It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself;And earthly power doth then show likest God’sWhen mercy seasons justice.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


The quality of mercy is not strained;It droppeth as the gentle rain from heavenUpon the place beneath. It is twice blessed;It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes.’Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomesThe throned monarch better than his crown; * * * * *It is enthroned in the hearts of kings;It is an attribute to God himself.

— William Shakespeare


She will outstrip all praise and make it halt behind her.

— William Shakespeare, The Tempest


O God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains!” – Cassio (Act II, Scene iii)

— William Shakespeare, Othello


    Oh, devil, devil!If that the earth could teem with woman’s tears, Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile.Out of my sight!

— William Shakespeare


I think the devil will not have me damned, lest the oil that’s in me should set hell on fire.

— William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor


When devils will the blackest sins put onThey do suggest at first with heavenly shows

— William Shakespeare


What is a man, if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, looking before and after, gave us not that capability and god-like reason to fust in us unused.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty.To you I am bound for life and education.My life and education both do learn meHow to respect you. You are the lord of my duty, I am hitherto your daughter. But here’s my husband, And so much duty as my mother showedTo you, preferring you before her father, So much I challenge that I may professDue to the Moor my lord.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity. But I know none, and therefore am no beast.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


If I had a thousand sons, the first humane principle I would teach them should be to forswear thin potations and to addict themselves to sack.

— William Shakespeare


O, beware, my lord, of jealousy;It is the green-ey’d monster, which doth mockThe meat it feeds on.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


O, beware, my lord, of jealousy;It is the green-ey’d monster, which doth mockThe meat it feeds on. That cuckold lives in bliss, Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger:But O, what damnèd minutes tells he o’erWho dotes, yet doubts, suspects, yet strongly loves!(Act 3, scene 3, 165–171)

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Trifles light as air are to the jealous confirmations strong as proofs of holy writ.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting, Lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing, — For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble.

— William Shakespeare


The Weird Sisters, hand in hand, Posters of the sea and land, Thus do go, about, about, Thrice to thine, thrice to mine, And thrice again to make up nine.Peace, the charm’s wound up.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!Here will we sit and let the sounds of musicCreep in our ears: soft stillness and the nightBecome the touches of sweet harmony.Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heavenIs thick inlaid with patines of bright gold:There’s not the smallest orb which thou behold’stBut in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;Such harmony is in immortal souls;But whilst this muddy vesture of decayDoth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.”- Lorenzo, Acte V, Scene 1

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Pour on, I will endure.

— William Shakespeare


The lunatic, the lover, and the poetAre of imagination all compact:One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt:The poet’s eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven, And as imagination bodies forthThe forms of things unknown, the poet’s penTurns them to shapes and gives to airy nothingA local habitation and a name.

— William Shakespeare


So many horrid Ghosts.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered-We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;For he to-day that sheds his blood with meShall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition;And gentlemen in England now-a-bedShall think themselves accurs’d they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaksThat fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


Romeo: I dreamt a dream tonight.Mercutio: And so did I.Romeo: Well, what was yours?Mercutio: That dreamers often lie.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Benvolio: What sadness lengthens Romeo’s hours?Romeo: Not having that, which, having, makes them short.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


…and when he dies, cut him out in little stars, and the face of heaven will be so fine that all the world will be in love with night and pay no heed to the garish sun.

— William Shakespeare


You speak an infinite deal of nothing.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


These violent delights have violent endsAnd in their triump die, like fire and powderWhich, as they kiss, consume

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Conscience doth make cowards of us all.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Some are born great, others achieve greatness.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


All’s well that ends well.

— William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well


Are you sure/That we are awake? It seems to me/That yet we sleep, we dream

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


This goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory, this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o’erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


All causes shall give way: I am in bloodStepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o’er.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The Play’s the Thing, wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the King.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars/ But in ourselves.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds.

— William Shakespeare, Love Poems and Sonnets


And therefore, — since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, —I am determined to prove a villain, And hate the idle pleasures of these days.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul But I do love thee! and when I love thee not, Chaos is come again.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


Your face, my thane, is as a book where menMay read strange matters. To beguile the time, Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under’t.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


The sweetest honey is loathsome in its own deliciousness. And in the taste destroys the appetite. Therefore, love moderately.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


You are thought here to the most senseless and fit man for the job.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


They lie deadly that tell you have good faces.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


Yet but three come one more.Two of both kinds make up four.Ere she comes curst and sad.Cupid is a knavish lad.Thus to make poor females mad.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! And yet again wonderful, and after that, out of all hooping.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


By my soul I swear, there is no power in the tongue of man to alter me.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


Antonio: Will you stay no longer? nor will you not that I go with you? Sebastian: By your patience, no. My stars shine darkly over me; the malignancy of my fate might, perhaps, distemper yours; therefore I shall crave of you your leave that I may bear my evils alone. It were a bad recompense for your love to lay any of them on you.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


He kills her in her own humor.

— William Shakespeare


Alack, there lies more peril in thine eyeThan twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


And since you know you cannot see yourself, so well as by reflection, I, your glass, will modestly discover to yourself, that of yourself which you yet know not of.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


And nothing is, but what is not.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


My Crown is in my heart, not on my head:Not deck’d with Diamonds, and Indian stones:Nor to be seen: my Crown is call’d Content, A Crown it is, that seldom Kings enjoy.

— William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 3


But Kate, dost thou understand thus much English? Canst thou love me?”Catherine: “I cannot tell.”Henry: “Can any of your neighbours tell, Kate? I’ll ask them.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


If one good deed in all my life I did, I do repent it from my very soul.

— William Shakespeare


O, that he were here to write me down an ass! But, masters, remember, that I am an ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.

— William Shakespeare


I can call spirits from the vasty deep.”Why so can I, or so can any man. But will they come when you do call for them?

— William Shakespeare


They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain and nourish all the world.

— William Shakespeare


Thou whoreson zed! Thou unnecessary letter! My lord, if you will give me leave, I will tread this unbolted villain into mortar, and daub the wall of a jakes with him. *all cheer for Shakespearean insults*

— William Shakespeare


But men may construe things after their fashion, Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with snow as seek to quench the fire of love with words.

— William Shakespeare


For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause

— William Shakespeare


To die, is to be banish’d from myself; And Silvia is myself: banish’d from her, Is self from self: a deadly banishment! What light is light, if Silvia be not seen? What joy is joy, if Silvia be not by? Unless it be to think that she is by, And feed upon the shadow of perfection.Except I be by Silvia in the night, There is no music in the nightingale; Unless I look on Silvia in the day, There is no day for me to look upon; She is my essence, and I leave to be, If I be not by her fair influence Foster’d, illumin’d, cherish’d, kept alive.

— William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona


She is drowned already, sir, with salt water, though I seem to drown her remembrance again with more.

— William Shakespeare


-Gardener: …Go thou, and like an executioner, Cut off the heads of too fast growing sprays, That look too lofty in our commonwealth:All must be even in our government.You thus employ’d, I will go root awayThe noisome weeds, which without profit suckThe soil’s fertility from wholesome flowers.+Servant:Why should we in the compass of a paleKeep law and form and due proportion, Showing, as in a model, our firm estate, When our sea-walled garden, the whole land, Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up, Her fruit-trees all upturned, her hedges ruin’d, Her knots disorder’d and her wholesome herbsSwarming with caterpillars?-Gardener:Hold thy peace! He that hath suffer’d this disorder’d springHath now himself met with the fall of leaf.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Life is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Pleasure and revenge have ears more deaf than adders to the voice of any true decision.

— William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida


What do I fear? Myself? There’s none else by.Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


[Act 5, Scene 4, ROSALIND] If I were a woman I would kiss as many of you as had beards that pleased me, complexions that liked me and breaths that I defied not: and, I am sure, as many as have good beards or good faces or sweet breaths will, for my kind offer, when I make curtsy, bid me farewell.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


If I could write the beauty of your eyesAnd in fresh numbers number all your graces, The age to come would say ‘this poet lies! Such heaven never touched earthly faces

— William Shakespeare


Must I observe you? Must I stand & crouchUnder your testy humour? By the gods, You shall digest the venom ofyour spleen, Though it do split you, for, from thisday forth, I’ll use you for my mirth, yea, for my laughter, when you are waspish.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


No, take more! What may be sworn by, both divine and human, Seal what I end withal! This double worship, Where [one] part does disdain with cause, the other Insult without all reason; where gentry, title, wisdom, Cannot conclude but by the yea and no Of general ignorance— it must omit Real necessities, and give way the while To unstable slightness. Purpose so barr’d, it follows Nothing is done to purpose. Therefore beseech you— You that will be less fearful than discreet; That love the fundamental part of state More than you doubt the change on’t; that prefer A noble life before a long, and wish To jump a body with a dangerous physic That’s sure of death without it— at once pluck out The multitudinous tongue; let them not lick The sweet which is their poison. Your dishonor Mangles true judgment, and bereaves the state Of that integrity which should become’t; Not having the power to do the good it would, For th’ ill which doth control’t.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


Turn hell-hound, turn.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


How true a twain Seemeth this concordant one! Love hath reason, Reason none, If what parts, can so remain.

— William Shakespeare, The Phoenix and the Turtle


Timon: I’ll beat thee, but I should infect my hands.

— William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens


Timon: Would thou wert clean enough to spit upon!

— William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens


O mother, mother!What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural sceneThey laugh at. O my mother, mother! O!You have won a happy victory to Rome;But, for your son, –believe it, O, believe it, Most dangerously you have with him prevail’d, If not most mortal to him.

— William Shakespeare


Tis like she comes to speak of Cassio’s death, The noise was high. Ha! No more moving?Still as the grave. Shall she come in? Were ’t good?I think she stirs again—No. What’s best to do?If she come in, she’ll sure speak to my wife—My wife! my wife! what wife? I have no wife.Oh, insupportable! Oh, heavy hour!Methinks it should be now a huge eclipseOf sun and moon, and that th’ affrighted globeShould yawn at alteration.

— William Shakespeare, Othello


I’ll prove the prettier fellow of the two and wear my dagger with the braver grace

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


The rest is silence.

— William Shakespeare


I can say little more than I have studied, and that question’s out of my part.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Then the conceit of this inconstant staySets you rich in youth before my sight, Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay, To change your day of youth to sullied night;And all in war with Time for love of you, As he takes from you I engraft you new.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!

— William Shakespeare


For all that beauty that doth cover theeIs but the seemly raiment of my heart, Which in thy breast doth live, as thine in me.How can I then be elder than thou art?

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


To give yourself away keep yourself still, And you must live drawn by your own sweet skill.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive, And, constant stars, in them I read such art, As truth and beauty shall together thriveIf from thyself to store thou wouldst convert;Or else of thee I prognosticate, Thy end is truth’s and beauty’s doom and date.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Then, were not summer’s distillation leftA liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, Beauty’s effect with beauty were bereft, Nor it nor no remembrance what it was.But flowers distilled, though they with winter meet, Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Then of thy beauty do I question make, That thou among the wastes of time must go, Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake, And die as fast as they see others grow.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Fear no more the heat o’ the sun, Nor the furious winter’s rages;

— William Shakespeare


I have more care to staythan will to go.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


This is a way to kill a wife with kindness, And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.He that knows better how to tame a shrew, Now let him speak. ‘Tis charity to show.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


She vied so fast, protesting oath after oath, that in a twink she won me to her love.O, you are novices. ‘Tis a world to seeHow tame, when men and women are alone, A meacock wretch can make the curstest shrew.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Beatrice: I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick: nobody marks you.Benedick: What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


BEROWNE: What time o’ day?ROSALINE: The hour that fools should ask.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


By this reckoning he is more a shrew than she.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


For I am born to tame you, Kate, And bring you from a wild Kate to a KateComfortable as other household Kates.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Of all matches never was the like.

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


Mother, I will look to like. If looking liking moves.

— William Shakespeare


Your honour’s players, hearing your amendment, Are come to play a pleasant comedy, For so your doctors hold it very meet, Seeing too much sadness hath congealed your blood, And melancholy is the nurse of frenzy.Therefore they thought it good you hear a play, And frame your mind to mirth and merriment, Which bars a thousand harms and lenghtens life.

— William Shakespeare


I have drunk, and seen the spider.”(Leontine, Act II Scene I)

— William Shakespeare


Benedick: I protest I love thee.Beatrice: Why, then, God forgive me!Benedick: What offence, sweet Beatrice?Beatrice: You have stayed me in a happy hour: I was about toprotest I loved you.Benedick: And do it with all thy heart.Beatrice: I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.

— William Shakespeare


From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive:They are the ground, the books, the academes, From whence doth spring the true Promethean fire.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


We number nothing that we spend for you;Our duty is so rich, so infinite, That we may do it still without accompt.Vouchsafe to show the sunshine of your face, That we, like savages, may worship it.

— William Shakespeare


Be not lost So poorly in your thoughts.

— William Shakespeare


LXXVSo are you to my thoughts as food to life, Or as sweet-season’d showers are to the ground;And for the peace of you I hold such strifeAs ‘twixt a miser and his wealth is found.Now proud as an enjoyer, and anonDoubting the filching age will steal his treasure;Now counting best to be with you alone, Then better’d that the world may see my pleasure:Sometime all full with feasting on your sight, And by and by clean starved for a look;Possessing or pursuing no delightSave what is had, or must from you be took. Thus do I pine and surfeit day by day, Or gluttoning on all, or all away.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Give me my Romeo. And when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fineThat all the world will be in love with nightAnd pay no worship to the garish sun.

— William Shakespeare


Weaving spiders, come not here, Hence, you long legged spinners, hence! Beetles black, approach not here, worm nor snail, do no offense.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Reply not to me with a fool-born jest.

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


For this last, Before and in Corioli, let me say, I cannot speak him home: he stopp’d the fliers; And by his rare example made the coward Turn terror into sport: as weeds before A vessel under sail, so men obey’d And fell below his stem: his sword, death’s stamp, Where it did mark, it took; from face to foot He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was timed with dying cries: alone he enter’d The mortal gate of the city, which he painted With shunless destiny; aidless came off, And with a sudden reinforcement struck Corioli like a planet: now all’s his: When, by and by, the din of war gan pierce His ready sense; then straight his doubled spirit Re-quicken’d what in flesh was fatigate, And to the battle came he; where he did Run reeking o’er the lives of men, as if ‘Twere a perpetual spoil: and till we call’d Both field and city ours, he never stood To ease his breast with panting.

— William Shakespeare


Go, prick thy face and over-red thy fear, Thou lily-livered boy.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Of all mad matches never was the likeBeing mad herself, she’s madly mated.

— William Shakespeare


The curse of true love never did run smooth.

— William Shakespeare


Men from children nothing differ.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Get you gone, you dwarf, You minimus of hindering knotgrass made, You bead, you acorn!

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh, Your vows to her and me, put in two scales, Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Brief as the lightning in the collied night;That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and Earth, And ere a man hath power to say “Behold!”The jaws of darkness do devour it up.So quick bright things come to confusion.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


They say an old man is twice a child

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


To sue to live, I find I seek to die; And, seeking death, find life.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


The fiend gives the more friendly counsel.

— William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice


You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, Knew you not Pompey?

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Mad I call it, for to define true madness, what is’t to be nothing else but mad?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Alack, when once our grace we have forgot, Nothing goes right; we would and we would not.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Thou of thyself thy sweet self dost deceive.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


He does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


In my mind’s eye

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet

— William Shakespeare


You are full of pretty answers. Have you not been acquainted with goldsmiths’ wives and conned them out of rings?

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


JAQUES: Rosalind is your love’s name?ORLANDO: Yes, just.JAQUES: I do not like her name.ORLANDO: There was no thought of pleasing you when she was christened.

— William Shakespeare, As You Like It


Hang there like a fruit, my soul, Till the tree die!-Posthumus LeonatusAct V, Scene V

— William Shakespeare, Cymbeline


Women may fail when there is no strength in man

— William Shakespeare


You gotta be cruel to be kind.

— William Shakespeare


Diseases desperate grown, By desperate appliance are relieved, Or not at all.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Be not self-willed, for thou art much too fairTo be death’s conquest and make worms thine heir.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Brutus: Kneel not, gentle Portia.Portia: I should need not, if you were gentle Brutus. Within the bond of marriage, tell me, Brutus, Is it excepted I should know no secrets That appertain to you? Am I yourself But, as it were, in sort or limitation, To keep with you at meals, comfort your bed, And talk to you sometimes? Dwell I but in the suburbs Of your good pleasure? If it be no more, Portia is Brutus’ harlot, not his wife.

— William Shakespeare


Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkissed.

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Strike as thou didst at Caesar; for I know / When though didst hate him worst, thou loved’st him better / Than ever thou loved’st Cassius.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


Friar Laurence:O, mickle is the powerful grace that liesIn herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities: For nought to vile that on the earth doth live, But to the earth some special good doth give; nor aught so good, but, strain’d from that fair use, Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse: Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied, And vice sometime’s by action dignified.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


My love is as a fever, longing stillFor that which longer nurseth the disease;Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please.My reason, the physician to my love, Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Hath left me, and I desperate now approve, Desire his death, which physic did except.Past cure I am, now reason is past care, And frantic-mad with evermore unrest;My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are, At random from the truth vainly express’d;For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.

— William Shakespeare


n sooth, I know not why I am so sad:It wearies me; you say it wearies you;But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born, I am to learn;And such a want-wit sadness makes of me, That I have much ado to know myself.

— William Shakespeare


Ram. My lord constable, the armor that I saw in your tent to-night, are those stars or suns upon it?Con. Stars, my lord.Dau. Some of them will fall to-morrow, I hope.Con. And yet my sky shall not want.Dau. That may be, for you bear a many superfluously, and ’twere more honor some were away.Con. Even as your horse bears your praises; who would trot as well, were some of your brags dismounted.Henry V, 3.7.69-78

— William Shakespeare


Lucentio: I read that I profess, the Art of Love.Bianca: And may you prove, sir, master of your art!Lucentio: While you, sweet dear, prove mistress of my heart!

— William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew


I think he’ll be to Rome as is the osprey to the fish, who takes it by sovereignty of nature.

— William Shakespeare, Coriolanus


O ill-starred wench! Pale as your smock!

— William Shakespeare, Othello


We will meet; and there we may rehearse mostobscenely and courageously.Shakespeare, Midsummer Night’s Dream. Spoken by Bottom, Act I Sc. 2

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


This story shall the good man teach his son;And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered-We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;For he to-day that sheds his blood with meShall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition;And gentlemen in England now-a-bedShall think themselves accurs’d they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaksThat fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day

— William Shakespeare


More grief to hide than hate to utter love. Polonius, Hamlet.

— William Shakespeare


In the corrupted currents of this worldOffence’s gilded hand may shove by justice, And oft ’tis seen the wicked prize itselfBuys out the law. . . (Claudius, from Hamlet, Act 3, scene 3)

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


When icicles hang by the wall, And Dick the shepherd blows his nail, And Tom bears logs into the hall, And milk comes frozen home in pail, When blood is nipp’d, and ways be foul, Then nightly sings the staring owl, To-whit! To-who!—a merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. When all aloud the wind doe blow, And coughing drowns the parson’s saw, And birds sit brooding in the snow, And Marian’s nose looks red and raw, When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl, Then nightly sings the staring owl, To-whit! To-who!—a merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

— William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost


Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal the mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne.

— William Shakespeare, Richard II


Middle Tennessee? Really? My bracket is more busted than Screech’s face during puberty.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


His beauty shall in these black lines be seen, and they shall live, and he in them still green.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Within the infant rind of this small flowerPoison hath residence and medicine power.For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;Being tasted, stays all senses with the heart.Two such opposèd kings encamp them still, In man as well as herbs—grace and rude will. And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.(Inside the little rind of this weak flower, there is both poison and powerful medicine. If you smell it, you feel good all over your body. But if you taste it, you die. There are two opposite elements in everything, in men as well as in herbs—good and evil. When evil is dominant, death soon kills the body like cancer.)

— William Shakespeare


You see we do, yet see you but our handsAnd this the bleeding business they have done:Our hearts you see not; they are pitiful

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


In emerald tufts, flowers purple, blue and white;Like sapphire, pearl, and rich embroidery, Buckled below fair knighthood’s bending knee;Fairies use flower for their charactery.

— William Shakespeare


it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


And thus I clothe my naked villainyWith odd old ends stol’n out of holy writ;And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.

— William Shakespeare, Richard III


See you now your bait of falsehood take this carp of truth; and thus do we of wisdom and of reach, with windlasses and with assays of bias, by indirections find directions out.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Disguise, I see thou art a wickedness, / Wherein the…enemy does much.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep.

— William Shakespeare


Come, gentlemen, I hope we shall drink down all unkindness.

— William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor


A good sherris-sack hath a twofold operation in it. It ascends me into the brain, dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapors which environ it, makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble, fiery, and delectable shapes, which, delivered o’er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.

— William Shakespeare


When we our betters see bearing our woes, We scarcely think our miseries our foes.

— William Shakespeare, King Lear


Summer’s lease hath all too short a date.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


O! how shall summer’s honey breath hold out, / Against the wrackful siege of battering days?

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


Then is courtesy a turncoat. But it is certain I am loved of all ladies, only you excepted: and I would I could find in my heart that I had not a hard heart; for, truly, I love none. Beatrice: A dear happiness to women: they would else have been troubled with a pernicious suitor. I thank God and my cold blood, I am of your humour for that: I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me. -Much Ado About Nothing

— William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Macbeth does murder sleep – the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care, The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, chief nourisher in life’s feast.

— William Shakespeare


Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O any thing, of nothing first create!O heavy lightness, serious vanity, Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!This love feel I, that feel no love in this.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Out of her favour, where I am in love.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Oh why rebuke you him that loves you so? / Lay breath so bitter on your bitter foe.

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Make me a willow cabin at your gateAnd call upon my soul within the house;Write loyal cantons of contemned loveAnd sing them loud even in the dead of night;Hallo your name to the reverberate hillsAnd make the babbling gossip of the airCry out “Olivia!” O, you should not restBetween the elements of air and earthBut you should pity me

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Sometimes we punish ourselves the most.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


Sometimes we punish our selves the most.

— William Shakespeare


Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe.

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves.

— William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar


He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear His hopes ‘bove wisdom, grace and fear:And you all know, securityIs mortals’ chiefest enemy.

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


There’s some ill planet reigns:I must be patient till the heavens lookWith an aspect more favourable. Good my lords, I am not prone to weeping, as our sexCommonly are; the want of which vain dewPerchance shall dry your pities: but I haveThat honourable grief lodged here which burnsWorse than tears drown: beseech you all, my lords, With thoughts so qualified as your charitiesShall best instruct you, measure me; and soThe king’s will be perform’d!

— William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale


What’s Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her?

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


The course of true love never die run smooth

— William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream


Nice customs curtsy to great kings.

— William Shakespeare, Henry V


The sleeping and the dead are but as pictures. Lady Macbeth

— William Shakespeare, Macbeth


Brevity is the soul of wit.

— William Shakespeare, Hamlet


Jack shall have Jill.Nought shall go ill.

— William Shakespeare


Good madonna, give me leave toprove you a fool.

— William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


The sweat of industry would dry and die, But for the end it works to.

— William Shakespeare, Cymbeline


No longer mourn for me when I am deadthan you shall hear the surly sullen bell give warning to the world that I am fled from this vile world with vilest worms to dwell: nay, if you read this line, remember not the hand that writ it, for I love you so, that I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, if thinking on me then should make you woe. O! if, I say, you look upon this verse when I perhaps compounded am with clay, do not so much as my poor name rehearse; but let your love even with my life decay; lest the wise world should look into your moan, and mock you with me after I am gone.

— William Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Sonnets


What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night, So stumblest on my counsel?*Who are you? Why do you hide in the darkness and listen to my private thoughts?*

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


What are you doing sister? / Killing swine.

— William Shakespeare


A peevish self-willed harlotry it is.*She’s a stubborn little brat.*

— William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet


But man, proud man, Dress’d in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he’s most assur’d—His glassy essence—like an angry apePlays such fantastic tricks before high heavenAs makes the angels weep; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.

— William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure


Things past redress are now with me past care.

— William Shakespeare


What cannot be avoided t’were childish weakness to lament or fear.

— William Shakespeare


A walking shadow a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more.

— William Shakespeare


The play’s the thing.

— William Shakespeare


Why then the world’s mine oyster Which I with sword will open.

— William Shakespeare


Action is eloquence.

— William Shakespeare


What’s done can’t be undone.

— William Shakespeare


Sweet are the uses of adversity Which like the toad ugly and venomous Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.

— William Shakespeare


Have more than thou showest Speak less than thou knowest.

— William Shakespeare


Age cannot wither her nor custom stale Her infinite variety.

— William Shakespeare


An old man is twice a child.

— William Shakespeare


Is it not strange that desire should so many years outlive performance?

— William Shakespeare


Golden lads and girls all must As chimney-sweepers come to dust.

— William Shakespeare


When that the poor have cried Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious And Brutus is an honourable man.

— William Shakespeare


Cowards die many times before their deaths the valiant never taste of death but once.

— William Shakespeare


Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs Being purged a fire sparkling in lovers’ eyes Being vex’d a sea nourish’d with lovers’ tears: What is it else? a madness most discreet A choking gall and a preserving sweet.

— William Shakespeare


Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.

— William Shakespeare


Neither a borrower nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

— William Shakespeare


To business that we love we rise betime And go to it with delight.

— William Shakespeare


God befriend us as our cause is just!

— William Shakespeare


Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered.

— William Shakespeare


His life was gentle and the elements So mixed in him that nature might stand up

— William Shakespeare


It is a wise father that knows his own child.

— William Shakespeare


The people are the city.

— William Shakespeare


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy But not express’d in fancy rich not gaudy For the apparel oft proclaims the man.

— William Shakespeare


The soul of this man is his clothes.

— William Shakespeare


Conscience is but a word that cowards use Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.

— William Shakespeare


Conscience does make cowards of us all.

— William Shakespeare


Thus conscience does make cowards of us all And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry And lose the name of action.

— William Shakespeare


I earn that I eat get that I wear owe no man hate envy no man’s happiness glad of other men’s good content with my harm.

— William Shakespeare


He is well paid that is well satisfied.

— William Shakespeare


Courage mounteth with occasion.

— William Shakespeare


But screw your courage to the sticking place and we’ll not fail.

— William Shakespeare


I must be cruel only to be kind.

— William Shakespeare


The dreadful dead of dark midnight.

— William Shakespeare


He that dies pays all debts.

— William Shakespeare


I care not a man can die but once we owe God a death.

— William Shakespeare


The stroke of death is as a lover’s pinch Which hurts and is desired.

— William Shakespeare


Nothing in his life Became him like the leaving it.

— William Shakespeare


No ’tis not so deep as a well nor so wide as a church door but ’tis enough ’twill serve: ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered I warrant for this world.

— William Shakespeare


The undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveller returns.

— William Shakespeare


I am dying Egypt dying.

— William Shakespeare


To die: – to sleep: No more and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to ’tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished.

— William Shakespeare


Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

— William Shakespeare


There is a divinity that shapes our ends Rough-hew them how we will.

— William Shakespeare


He will give the devil his due.

— William Shakespeare


The prince of darkness is a gentleman.

— William Shakespeare


This too shall pass.

— William Shakespeare


Come what come may time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

— William Shakespeare


How poor are they that have not patience? What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

— William Shakespeare


Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast.

— William Shakespeare


God grant us patience!

— William Shakespeare


Now is the Winter of our discontent.

— William Shakespeare


Let your own discretion be your tutor suit the action to the word the word to the action.

— William Shakespeare


The better part of valour is discretion.

— William Shakespeare


To be or not to be that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them?

— William Shakespeare


Our doubts are traitors And make us lose the good we oft might win By fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare


Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we often might win by fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare


We are such stuff As dreams are made on and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.

— William Shakespeare


He hath eaten me out of house and home.

— William Shakespeare


The royal throne of kings this scepter’d isle This earth of majesty this seat of Mars This other Eden demi-paradise This fortress built by nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war This happy breed of men this little world This precious stone set in the silver sea.

— William Shakespeare


All the world’s a stage And all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances And one man in his time plays many parts.

— William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravell’d slave of care The death of each day’s life sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds great nature’s second course Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

— William Shakespeare


There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.

— William Shakespeare


The evil that men do lives after them The good is oft interred with their bones.

— William Shakespeare


And oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse – As patches set upon a little breach Discredit more in hiding of the fault Than did the fault before it was so patched.

— William Shakespeare


A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.

— William Shakespeare


God has given you one face and you make yourselves another.

— William Shakespeare


The fault dear Brutus is not in our stars but in ourselves.

— William Shakespeare


Fairies black grey green and white You moonshine revellers and shades of night.

— William Shakespeare


I have touch’d the highest point of all my greatness And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now to my setting.

— William Shakespeare


Sweets to the sweet farewell!

— William Shakespeare


The fashion wears out more apparel than the man.

— William Shakespeare


I see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man.

— William Shakespeare


That that is is.

— William Shakespeare


O that men’s ears should be To counsel deaf but not to flattery!

— William Shakespeare


The fool doth think he is wise but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.

— William Shakespeare


A fool’s bolt is soon shot.

— William Shakespeare


Lord what fools these mortals be!

— William Shakespeare


Let me embrace thee sour adversity for wise men say it is the wisest course.

— William Shakespeare


Happy thou art not for what thou hast not still thou striv’est to get and what thou hast forget’est.

— William Shakespeare


My crown is called content a crown that seldom kings enjoy.

— William Shakespeare


Poor and content is rich and rich enough.

— William Shakespeare


O fortune fortune! all men call thee fickle.

— William Shakespeare


There is a tide in the affairs of men Which taken at the flood leads on to fortune.

— William Shakespeare


Frailty thy name is woman!

— William Shakespeare


I am wealthy in my friends.

— William Shakespeare


A friend should bear his friend’s infirmities.

— William Shakespeare


Those friends thou hast and their adoption tried grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel.

— William Shakespeare


The ripest fruit first falls.

— William Shakespeare


Foul whisperings are abroad.

— William Shakespeare


He does it with a better grace but I do it more natural.

— William Shakespeare


Some are born great some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.

— William Shakespeare


Every one can master a grief but he that has it.

— William Shakespeare


What’s gone and what’s past help Should be past grief.

— William Shakespeare


Unbidden guests Are often welcomest when they are gone.

— William Shakespeare


How use doth breed a habit in a man!

— William Shakespeare


I do desire we may be better strangers.

— William Shakespeare


Friends Romans countrymen lend me your ears.

— William Shakespeare


But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at I am not what I am.

— William Shakespeare


The cunning livery of hell.

— William Shakespeare


Help me Cassius or I sink!

— William Shakespeare


‘Tis not enough to help the feeble up but to support him after.

— William Shakespeare


He was a man take him for all in all I shall not look upon his like again.

— William Shakespeare


God made him and therefore let him pass for a man.

— William Shakespeare


Men must endure their going hence even as their coming hither ripeness is all.

— William Shakespeare


Every man has his fault and honesty is his.

— William Shakespeare


Ay sir to be honest as this world goes is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.

— William Shakespeare


For Brutus is an honourable man So are they all all honourable men.

— William Shakespeare


Honour pricks me on. Yea but how if honour prick me off when I come on? How then? Can honour set to a leg? No. Or an arm? No. Or take away the grief of a wound? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery then? No. What is honour? A word.

— William Shakespeare


The miserable have no medicine but hope.

— William Shakespeare


True hope is swift and flies with swallow’s wings Kings it makes Gods and meaner creatures kings.

— William Shakespeare


A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!

— William Shakespeare


A jest’s prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it never in the tongue Of him that makes it.

— William Shakespeare


Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look.

— William Shakespeare


Men are April when they woo December when they wed.

— William Shakespeare


Reputation is an idle and most false imposition oft got without merit and lost without deserving.

— William Shakespeare


This was the most unkindest cut of all For when the noble Caesar saw him stab Ingratitude more strong than traitor’s arm Quite vanquish’d him then burst his mighty heart.

— William Shakespeare


That he is mad ’tis true ’tis true ’tis pity And pity ’tis ’tis true.

— William Shakespeare


Though this be madness yet there is method in ‘t.

— William Shakespeare


Be thou as chaste as ice as pure as snow thou shalt not escape calumny.

— William Shakespeare


O God that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! that we should with joy pleas-ance revel and applause transform ourselves into beasts!

— William Shakespeare


Self-love my liege is not so vile a sin as self-neglecting.

— William Shakespeare


Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest of most excellent fancy.

— William Shakespeare


Jesters do often prove prophets.

— William Shakespeare


I am a Jew: Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands organs dimensions senses affections passions? fed with die same food hurt with the same weapons subject to the same diseases healed by the same means warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian is?

— William Shakespeare


I wish you all the joy that you can wish.

— William Shakespeare


Sweets with sweets war not joy delights in joy.

— William Shakespeare


A Daniel come to judgment! yea a Daniel! O wise young judge how I do honor thee!

— William Shakespeare


Thieves for their robbery have authority When judges steal themselves.

— William Shakespeare


Forbear to judge for we are sinners all.

— William Shakespeare


Give every man thine ear but few thy voice Take each man’s censure but reserve thy judgment.

— William Shakespeare


O judgment! thou are fled to brutish beasts And men have lost their reason!

— William Shakespeare


Are you good men and true?

— William Shakespeare


The jury passing on the prisoner’s life May in the sworn twelve have a thief or two Guiltier than him they try.

— William Shakespeare


This bond is forfeit And lawfully by this the Jew may claim A pound of flesh.

— William Shakespeare


Thrice is he arm’d that hath his quarrel just And he but naked though lock’d up in steel Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.

— William Shakespeare


At little more than kin and less than kind.

— William Shakespeare


Yet do I fear thy nature It is too full o’ the milk of human kindness.

— William Shakespeare


We know what we are but know not what we may be.

— William Shakespeare


And seeing ignorance is the curse of God Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

— William Shakespeare


But for my own part it was Greek to me.

— William Shakespeare


The law hath not been dead though it hath slept.

— William Shakespeare


The first thing we do let’s kill all the lawyers.

— William Shakespeare


What’s mine is yours and what is yours is mine.

— William Shakespeare


Such as we are made of such we be.

— William Shakespeare


One man in his time plays many parts.

— William Shakespeare


If music be the food of love play on Give me excess of it that surfeiting The appetite may sicken and so die. That strain again! it had a dying fall: O it came o’er my ear like the sweet sound.

— William Shakespeare


Out out brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow.

— William Shakespeare


A light heart lives long.

— William Shakespeare


Love sought is good but given unsought is better.

— William Shakespeare


I shall not look upon his like again.

— William Shakespeare


A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.

— William Shakespeare


Men have died from time to time and worms have eaten them – but not for love.

— William Shakespeare


Ay me! for aught that I ever could read Could ever hear by tale or history The course of true love never did run smooth.

— William Shakespeare


Give me my Romeo and when he shall die. Take him and cut him out in little stars And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.

— William Shakespeare


What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet to me what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me: no nor woman neidier though by your smiling you seem to say so.

— William Shakespeare


His life was gentle and the elements So mix’d in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world This was a man!

— William Shakespeare


Men are April when they woo December when they wed maids are May when they are maids but the sky changes when they are wives.

— William Shakespeare


Goodnight! Goodnight! Parting is such sweet sorrow That I shall say goodnight ’til it be morrow.

— William Shakespeare


Tis mightiest in the mightiest it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown His sceptre shows the force of temporal power The attribute to awe and majesty Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings But mercy is above this sceptred sway It is enthroned in the hearts of kings It is an attribute to God himself And earthly power doth then show likest God’s When mercy seasons justice.

— William Shakespeare


Tis but a base ignoble mind That mounts no higher than a bird can soar.

— William Shakespeare


Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

— William Shakespeare


The worst is not sSo long as we can say “This is the worst.”

— William Shakespeare


Neither a borrower nor a lender be for loan oft loses both itself and friend and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

— William Shakespeare


As full of spirit as the month of May.

— William Shakespeare


The ides of March are come.

— William Shakespeare


The grey-ey’d morn smiles on the frowning night Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light.

— William Shakespeare


Murder most foul as in the best it is But this most foul strange and unnatural.

— William Shakespeare


For murder though it have no tongue will speak With most miraculous organ.

— William Shakespeare


The man that hath no music in himself Nor is no moved with concord of sweet sounds Is fit for treasons stratagems and spoils.

— William Shakespeare


I cannot tell what the dickens his name is.

— William Shakespeare


But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him And makes me poor indeed.

— William Shakespeare


What’s in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.

— William Shakespeare


To hold as ‘t were the mirror up to nature.

— William Shakespeare


One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.

— William Shakespeare


A plague o’ both your houses.

— William Shakespeare


There’s villainous news abroad.

— William Shakespeare


Making night hideous.

— William Shakespeare


This was the noblest Roman of them all.

— William Shakespeare


Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.

— William Shakespeare


I’ll take thy word for faith not ask thine oath Who shuns not to break one will sure crack both.

— William Shakespeare


Let them obey that know not how to rule.

— William Shakespeare


The insolence of office.

— William Shakespeare


Make use of time let not advantage slip.

— William Shakespeare


I wasted time and now doth time waste me.

— William Shakespeare


The clock upbraids me with the waste of time.

— William Shakespeare


Come what may time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

— William Shakespeare


Time is the king of men.

— William Shakespeare


There is a tide in the affairs of men Which taken at the flood leads on to fortune.

— William Shakespeare


My crown is called content a crown it is that seldom kings enjoy.

— William Shakespeare


The world’s mine oyster Which I with sword will open.

— William Shakespeare


Good-night good-night! parting is such sweet sorrow That I shall say good-night till it be morrow.

— William Shakespeare


Give me that man That is not passion’s slave.

— William Shakespeare


I am as poor as Job my lord but not so patient.

— William Shakespeare


And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of?

— William Shakespeare


How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

— William Shakespeare


Many strokes though with a little axe Hew down and fell the hardest-timber’d oak.

— William Shakespeare


Adversity’s sweet milk philosophy.

— William Shakespeare


For there was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently.

— William Shakespeare


There are more things in heaven and earth Horatio Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

— William Shakespeare


There was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently.

— William Shakespeare


A politician . . . one that would circumvent God.

— William Shakespeare


Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

— William Shakespeare


Assume a virtue if you have it not.

— William Shakespeare


The fault dear Brutus is not in our stars But in ourselves that we are underlings.

— William Shakespeare


Now I am past all comforts here but prayer.

— William Shakespeare


My words fly up my thoughts remain below Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

— William Shakespeare


We do pray for mercy and that same prayer doth teach us all to render the deeds of mercy.

— William Shakespeare


We ignorant of ourselves beg often our own harms which the wise powers deny us for our good.

— William Shakespeare


Sermons in stones and good in every thing.

— William Shakespeare


Modest doubt is call’d The beacon of the wise.

— William Shakespeare


He that doth the ravens feed. Yea providently caters for the sparrow. Be comfort to my age!

— William Shakespeare


We cannot all be masters.

— William Shakespeare


Every why hath a wherefore.

— William Shakespeare


I have no other but a woman’s reason. I think him so because I think him so.

— William Shakespeare


The purest treasure mortal times afford Is spotless reputation that away Men are but gilded loam or painted clay.

— William Shakespeare


Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

— William Shakespeare


Ay every inch a king.

— William Shakespeare


Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault dear Brutus is not in our stars But in ourselves that we are underlings.

— William Shakespeare


Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare


I to myself am dearer than a friend.

— William Shakespeare


Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie.

— William Shakespeare


Men at some time are masters of their fates.

— William Shakespeare


My heart is ever at your service.

— William Shakespeare


O shame! Where is they blush?

— William Shakespeare


Ships are but boards sailors but men.

— William Shakespeare


I am a man More sinn’d against than sinning.

— William Shakespeare


I am disgrac’d impeach’d and baffled here – Pierc’d to the soul with slander’s venom’d spear.

— William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleave of care The death of each day’s life sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds great nature’s second course Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

— William Shakespeare


To sleep! perchance to dream ay there’s the rub For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil Must give us pause.

— William Shakespeare


O sleep O gentle sleep Nature’s soft nurse.

— William Shakespeare


What’s gone and what’s past help should be past grief.

— William Shakespeare


When sorrows come they come not as single spies But in battalions!

— William Shakespeare


More in sorrow than in anger.

— William Shakespeare


The empty vessel makes the greatest sound.

— William Shakespeare


He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.

— William Shakespeare


If all the year were playing holidays To sport would be as tedious as to work.

— William Shakespeare


These blessed candles of the night.

— William Shakespeare


And thereby hangs a tale.

— William Shakespeare


Things done well and with care exempt themselves from fear.

— William Shakespeare


To climb steep hills Requires slow pace at first.

— William Shakespeare


Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind The thief doth fear each bush an officer.

— William Shakespeare


I will a round unvarnish’d tale deliver.

— William Shakespeare


Talkers are no good doers.

— William Shakespeare


If you have tears prepare to shed them now.

— William Shakespeare


Beggar that I am I am even poor in thanks.

— William Shakespeare


How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is To have a thankless child.

— William Shakespeare


What is the city but the people?

— William Shakespeare


If you can look into the seeds of time and say which grain will grow and which will not speak then to me.

— William Shakespeare


Praising what is lost makes the remembrance dear.

— William Shakespeare


Past and to come seems best things present worst.

— William Shakespeare


Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York.

— William Shakespeare


A plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another!

— William Shakespeare


Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.

— William Shakespeare


Much rain wears the marble.

— William Shakespeare


Many strokes though with a little axe hew down and fell the hardest-timber’d oak.

— William Shakespeare


How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.

— William Shakespeare


There’s a time for all things.

— William Shakespeare


The time is out of joint.

— William Shakespeare


O call back yesterday bid time return.

— William Shakespeare


Many a man’s tongue shakes out his master’s undoing.

— William Shakespeare


When I was at home I was in a better place but travellers must be content.

— William Shakespeare


Et tu Brute! (You too Brutus!)

— William Shakespeare


To take arms against a sea of troubles.

— William Shakespeare


Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

— William Shakespeare


I love thee I love but thee With a love that shall not die Till the sun grows cold And the stars grow old.

— William Shakespeare


‘Tis true ’tis pity And pity ’tis ’tis true.

— William Shakespeare


My man’s as true as steel.

— William Shakespeare


‘Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss.

— William Shakespeare


There’s a small choice in rotten apples.

— William Shakespeare


Her voice was ever soft Gentle and low an excellent thing in woman.

— William Shakespeare


We few we happy few we band of brothers For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother.

— William Shakespeare


O war! thou son of Hell!

— William Shakespeare


Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth Finds the down pillow hard.

— William Shakespeare


For some must watch while some must sleep thus runs the world away.

— William Shakespeare


I must be cruel Only to be kind.

— William Shakespeare


Blow wind and crack your cheeks. Rage! Blow!

— William Shakespeare


Thy wish was father to that thought.

— William Shakespeare


Great men may jest with saints ’tis wit in them But in the less foul profanation.

— William Shakespeare


Age cannot wither her nor custom stale her infinite variety other women cloy the appetites they feed but she makes hungry where most she satisfies.

— William Shakespeare


Fraily thy name is woman!

— William Shakespeare


Sigh no more ladies sigh no more Men were deceivers ever One foot in sea and one on shore To one thing constant never.

— William Shakespeare


She’s beautiful and therefore to be woo’d: She is a woman therefore to be won.

— William Shakespeare


O gentle Romeo If thou dost love pronounce it faithfully. Or if thou think’st I am too quickly won I’ll frown and be perverse and say thee nay So thou wilt woo: but else not for the world.

— William Shakespeare


My word fly up my thoughts remain below: Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

— William Shakespeare


But yesterday the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world now lies he there And none so poor to do him reverence.

— William Shakespeare


Taffeta phrases silken terms precise Three-piled hyperboles spruce affectation Figures pedantical.

— William Shakespeare


If all the year were playing holidays To sport would be as tedious as to work.

— William Shakespeare


All the world’s a stage And all the men and women merely players.

— William Shakespeare


Why then the world’s mine oyster Which I with sword will open.

— William Shakespeare


The worst is not so long as we can say “This is the worst.”

— William Shakespeare


Crabbed age and youth cannot live together Youth is full of pleasure age is full of care Youth like summer morn age like winter weather Youth like summer brave age like winter bare. Youth is full sport age’s breath is short Youth is nimble age is lame Youth is hot and bold age is weak and cold Youth is wild age is tame. Age I do abhor thee youth I do adore thee.

— William Shakespeare


Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!It seems she hangs upon the cheek of nightLike a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear, Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.So shows a snowy dove trooping with crowsAs yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand, And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.

— William Shakespeare


Enter RUMOUR, painted full of ton

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


Rumour is a pipeBlown by surmises, jealousies, conjecturesAnd of so easy and so plain a stopThat the blunt monster with uncounted heads, The still-discordant wavering multitude, Can play upon it.

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


RUMOUR:”Upon my tongues continual slanders ride, The which in every language I pronounce, Stuffing the ears of men with false reports.

— William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2


We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

— William Shakespeare


We are such stuff as dreams are made on and our little life is rounded with a sleep.

— William Shakespeare


Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

— William Shakespeare


Doubt thou the stars are fire, Doubt that the sun doth move. Doubt truth to be a liar, But never doubt I love.

— William Shakespeare


The love of heaven makes one heavenly.

— William Shakespeare


As soon go kindle fire with snow, as seek to quench the fire of love with words.

— William Shakespeare


I was adored once too.

— William Shakespeare


What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god.

— William Shakespeare


Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.

— William Shakespeare


Fishes live in the sea, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones.

— William Shakespeare


And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.

— William Shakespeare


Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.

— William Shakespeare


No, I will be the pattern of all patience; I will say nothing.

— William Shakespeare


Cowards die many times before their deaths the valiant never taste of death but once.

— William Shakespeare


Death is a fearful thing.

— William Shakespeare


The stroke of death is as a lover’s pinch, which hurts and is desired.

— William Shakespeare


And why not death rather than living torment? To die is to be banish’d from myself And Silvia is myself: banish’d from her Is self from self: a deadly banishment!

— William Shakespeare


I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.

— William Shakespeare


The valiant never taste of death but once.

— William Shakespeare


The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils.

— William Shakespeare


A man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age.

— William Shakespeare


But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes.

— William Shakespeare


All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.

— William Shakespeare


Like as the waves make towards the pebbl’d shore, so do our minutes, hasten to their end.

— William Shakespeare


We are time’s subjects, and time bids be gone.

— William Shakespeare


Men’s vows are women’s traitors!

— William Shakespeare


But men are men the best sometimes forget.

— William Shakespeare


There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.

— William Shakespeare


Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow.

— William Shakespeare


How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.

— William Shakespeare


Talking isn’t doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well and yet words are not deeds.

— William Shakespeare


Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.

— William Shakespeare


The evil that men do lives after them the good is oft interred with their bones.

— William Shakespeare


God has given you one face, and you make yourself another.

— William Shakespeare


Ignorance is the curse of God knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

— William Shakespeare


Things done well and with a care, exempt themselves from fear.

— William Shakespeare


Boldness be my friend.

— William Shakespeare


Who could refrain that had a heart to love and in that heart courage to make love known?

— William Shakespeare


Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.

— William Shakespeare


To do a great right do a little wrong.

— William Shakespeare


I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad and to travel for it too!

— William Shakespeare


When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.

— William Shakespeare


Now, God be praised, that to believing souls gives light in darkness, comfort in despair.

— William Shakespeare


Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne’er loved them.

— William Shakespeare


Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.

— William Shakespeare


Let every eye negotiate for itself and trust no agent.

— William Shakespeare


Let no such man be trusted.

— William Shakespeare


Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.

— William Shakespeare


The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact.

— William Shakespeare


There’s no art to find the mind’s construction in the face.

— William Shakespeare


I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano; A stage where every man must play a part, And mine is a sad one.

— William Shakespeare


Neither a borrower nor a lender be.

— William Shakespeare


My pride fell with my fortunes.

— William Shakespeare


For I can raise no money by vile means.

— William Shakespeare


Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.

— William Shakespeare


There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And we must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures.

— William Shakespeare


This life, which had been the tomb of his virtue and of his honour, is but a walking shadow; a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more: it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

— William Shakespeare


I bear a charmed life.

— William Shakespeare


Love sought is good, but given unsought, is better.

— William Shakespeare


Let me embrace thee, sour adversity, for wise men say it is the wisest course.

— William Shakespeare


The evil that men do lives after them the good is oft interred with their bones.

— William Shakespeare


If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottage princes’ palaces.

— William Shakespeare


But men are men the best sometimes forget.

— William Shakespeare