65 Inspiring Liane Moriarty Quotes (Free List)

Liane Moriarty quotes are thought-provoking, memorable and inspiring. From views on society and politics to thoughts on love and life, Liane Moriarty has a lot to say. In this list we present the 65 best Liane Moriarty quotes, in no particular order. Let yourself get inspired!

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Liane Moriarty quotes

We were so happy.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


She quite liked this aspect of her personality, the way her mood could change from melancholy to euphoric because of a breeze or a flavor or a beautiful chord progression. It meant she never had to feel too down about feeling down.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


Baths, she thought, were just like her relationships, all “ooh, ah” in the beginning and then suddenly, without warning, she had to get out, out, out!

— Liane Moriarty, Three Wishes


It was strange, because she always felt that she hid herself from Erika, that she was more ‘herself’ with her ‘true’ friends, where the friendship flowed in an ordinary, uncomplicated, grown-up fashion (emails, phone calls, drinks, dinners, banter and jokes that everyone got), but right now it felt like none of those friends knew her the raw, ugly, childish, basic way that Erika did.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


Toxic’ was actually an accurate description of the feelings Clementine had so often felt in Erika’s presence: the intense aggravation she had to work so hard to resist and conceal, the disappointment with herself, because Erika wasn’t evil or cruel or stupid, she was simply annoying, and Clementine’s response to her annoyingness was so completely disporportionate, it embarassed and confounded her. Erika loved Clementine. She’d do anything for her. So why did she inflame Clementine so? It was like she was allergic to her.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


One of the multitudes of exboyfriends had been a country music fan and left Gemma with an unfortunate passion for Tammy Wynette. It was like, Cat thought, he’d given her herpes.

— Liane Moriarty, Three Wishes


Somehow she knew there would be an unspoken truce on their unspoken battle over God knew what when they were old. They could both surrender to their innate grumpiness. It was going to be a lovely relief.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


It’s because we live in a beauty-obsessed society where the most important thing a woman can do is make herself attractive to men.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


If someone had asked him about his dreams on the morning of the barbecue, he would have said that he didn’t want for much, but he wouldn’t mind a lower mortgage, a tidier house, another baby – ideally a son, but he’d take another girl no problem at all – a big motherfucking boat if it were up for grabs, and more sex. He would have laughed about the sex. Or smiled at least. A rueful smile. Maybe the smile would have been exactly halfway between rueful and bitter.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


And maybe it was more than that.Maybe it was actually an unspoken instant agreement between the four women on the balcony: No woman should pay for the accidental death of this particular man. Maybe it was an involuntary, atavistic response to thousands of years of violence against women. Maybe it was for every rape, every brutal backhanded slap, every other Perry that had come before this one.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


Something snapped, ” said Madeline. She saw Perry’s hand shining back in its graceful, practiced arc. She heard Bonnie’s guttural voice. It occurred to her that there were so many levels of evil in the world. Small evils like her own malicious words. Like not inviting a child to a party. Bigger evils like walking out on your wife and newborn baby or sleeping with your child’s nanny. And then there was the sort of evil which Madeline had no experience: cruelty in hotel rooms and violence in suburban homes and little girls sold like merchandise, shattering innocent hearts.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


Sometimes there was the pure, primal pain of grief, and other times there was anger, the frantic desire to claw and hit and kill, and sometimes, like right now, ther was just ordinary, dull sadness, settling itself softly, suffocatingly over her like a heave fog.She was just so damned sad.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


You okay, Mum?” said Rob.”I’m fine, ” said Rachel. She went to reach for her cup of coffee and found that she didn’t have the energy to even lift her arm.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


It’s about making a choice to make your marriage a priority, to, kind of, put that at the top of the page, as your mission statement or something.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


He knew how the audition was going to affect their lives for the next ten weeks as she slowly lost her mind from nerves and the strain of trying to scrounge precious practice time from an already jam-packed life. No matter how much time poor Sam gave her, it would never be quite enough, because what she actually needed was for him and the kids to just temporarily not exist. She needed to slip into another dimension where she was a single, childless person. Just between now and the audition. She needed to go to a mountain chalet (somewhere with good acoustics) and live and breathe nothing but music. Go for walks. Meditate. Eat well. Do all those positive-visualization exercises young musicians did these days. She had an awful suspicion that if she were to do this in reality, she might not even miss Sam and the children that much, or if she did miss them, it would be quite bearable.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


She meant that they’d never used words like “separation” and “divorce” even in their worst screaming matches. They yelled things like, “You’re infuriating!” “You don’t think!” “You are the most annoying woman in the history of annoying women!” “I hate you!” “I hate you more!” and they always, always used the word “always, ” even though Clementine’s mother had said you should never use that word in an argument with your spouse, as in, for example, “You always forget to refill the water jug!” (But Sam did always forget. It was accurate.)

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


This was historical revisionism at its best, and hadn’t Sam always specialized in that, hadn’t she always said she wished she had a permanent film rolling of their life so she could go back and prove that, yes, he did so say that thing he now denied?

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


If he could just have one more chance, he’d act like the man he’d always believed himself to be.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


Why hadn’t that been part of his stupid lifelong redemption program: Do what my wife asks immediately so she doesn’t feel like a nag.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


Nothing is rigid. Things change. You can change your mind. You can change your thinking.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


You can think something is one way all your life, and it turns out you’re wrong, it can be something else entirely.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


People can do what they like in the privacy of their own homes.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


Not all mysteries are meant to be solved. Not all secrets are meant to be told.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


You think terrible things happened on the battlefields, but terrible things happened in ordinary suburban homes.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


Every marriage, every family, has its mysteries.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


Women always reveal their deepest secrets to each other.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


When you divorce someone, you divorce their whole family.

— Liane Moriarty


She felt hot liquid anger suddenly cool and harden into something powerful and immovable.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


What are you babbling on about, woman?” sighed Chloe. She’d picked this phrase up from her father and imitated his weary tone perfectly. They’d made the mistake of laughing the first time she did it, so she’d kept it up, and said it just often enough, and with perfect timing, so that they couldn’t help but keep laughing.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


Why did they all have to tread so very delicately around Celeste’s money? It was like wealth was an embarrassing medical condition. It was the same with Celeste’s beauty. Strangers gave Celeste the same furtive looks they gave to people with missing limbs, and if Madeline ever mentioned Celeste’s looks, Celeste responded with something like shame. “Shhh, ” she’d say, looking around fearfully in case someone overheard. Everyone wanted to be rich and beautiful, but the truly rich and beautiful had to pretend they were just the same as everyone else. Oh, it was a funny old world.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


In those years when their mother disappeared into herself, and old Mrs Jeffrey next door turned into Frannie, their honorary grandmother, Alice also taught herself how to change light bulbs, fix running toilets and cook chops and veggies while Elisabeth learned how to demand refunds, pay bills, fill in forms and talk to strangers.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


She was busy thinking about the concept of forgiveness. It was such a lovely, generous idea when it wasn’t linked to something awful that needed forgiving.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


I didn’t have enough other people in my life to cover the loss of this many people at once. I didn’t have spare aunties or cousins or grandparents. I didn’t have backup. I didn’t have insurance to cover a loss like this.

— Liane Moriarty, The Hypnotist’s Love Story


Only a man could come up with something so ruthless, so essentially stupid and yet brutally effective.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


As seductive as it might have been to erase the grief and pain of the last ten years, it was also a lie. Young Alice was a fool. A sweet, innocent fool. Young Alice hadn’t experienced ten years of living.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


I remember thinking about how mothers were prepared to run into burning buildings to save their children’s lives. I thought I should be able to go through a bit more suffering, a bit more inconvenience to give my children life. It made me feel noble. But now I realize I’m a crazy woman running into a burning house for children who don’t exist.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


Life was all about consequences

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


She wanted to hug him and at the same time she kind of wanted to slap him.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


If parents had children who were good sleepers, they assumed this was due to their good parenting, not good luck. They followed the rules, and the rules had been proven to work. Celeste must therefore not be following the rules. And you could never prove it to them! They would die smug in their beds.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


Helicopter parents. Before I started at Pirriwee Public, I thought it was an exaggeration, this thing about parents being overly involved with their kids. I mean, my mum and dad loved me, they were, like, interested in me when I was growing up in the nineties, but they weren’t, like, obsessed with me.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


When someone you loved was depending on your lie, it was perfectly easy.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


If her mother had been observing this interaction, she’d tell Clementine she was wrong, that she needed to keep talking, to say everything that was on her mind, to communicate, to leave no possibility for misinterpretation.If her father were here, he’d put his finger to his lips and say, “Shh.”Clementine settled for two words.”I’m sorry, ” she said.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


It seemed to her everyone had too much self-protective pride to truly strip off down to their souls in front of their long-term partners. It was easier to pretend there was nothing more to know, to fall into an easygoing companionship. It was almost embarrassing to be truly intimate with your spouse; because how could you watch someone floss one minute, and the next minute share your deepest passion or tritest of fears? It was almost easier to talk about that sort of thing before you’d shared a bathroom and a bank account and argued over the packing of the dishwasher.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


Polly had arrived in the world outraged to discover that her sisters had gotten there before her.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


Then he kissed her so deeply and so completely that she felt like she was falling, floating, spiraling down, down, down, like Alice in Wonderland.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


So now I just assume that it won’t work, and that if it does work, I’ll lose it anyway. This is meant to protect me, although it doesn’t, because somehow the hope sneakily finds its way in. I’m never aware of the hope until it’s gone, whooshed away like a rug pulled from under my feet, each time I hear another “I’m sorry.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


Great. Now Renata would have even more reason to dislike her. Jane would have an enemy. The last time she had had anything close to an enemy, she was in primary school herself. It had never crossed her mind that sending your child to school would be like going back to school yourself.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


Some secrets are meant to stay secret forever.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


The sky looks comfortingly mundane compared to the garish kaleidoscope of the stained glass. It makes Rose yearn to be reliving any one of a thousand ordinary days spent with her ordinary older sister, who has now done this extraordinary thing and died.

— Liane Moriarty, The Last Anniversary


As she drove the familiar route to the school, she considered her magnificent new age. Forty. She could still feel “forty” the way it felt when she was fifteen. Such a colorless age. Marooned in the middle of your life. Nothing would matter all that much when you were forty. You wouldn’t have real feelings when you were forty, because you’d be safely cushioned by your frumpy forty

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


They lost Olivia at Newport Beach. The panic made Alice hyperventilate. You were meant to be watching her, Nick kept saying. As if that were the point. That Alice had made a mistake. Not that Olivia was missing, but that it was Alice’s fault.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


When you divorce someone, you divorce their whole family, Madeline had told her once.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


There was something pathetic about the rejected wife bravely pulling herself together, joining a tennis club, doing a photography course, cutting her hair, venturing timidly back out onto the single scene.

— Liane Moriarty, Three Wishes


Just because a marriage ended didn’t mean that it hadn’t been happy at times.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


And even though I adore the fact that Francesca has Ben’s eyes, I also see now that her biological connection to us is irrelevant. She is her own little person. She is Francesca. If we weren’t her “natural” parents, we would still have loved her just as much.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


All conflict can be traced back to someone’s feelings getting hurt, don’t you think?

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


She felt detached from all aspects of her life. She had no time anymore to feel. All that time she used to waste feeling, and analyzing her feelings, as if they were a matter of national significance.

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


…the terrible thought occurred to her that perhaps she’d always unconsciously believed that because Sam didn’t cry, he therefore didn’t feel, or he felt less, not as profoundly or deeply as she did. Her focus had always been on how his actions affected her feelings, as if his role was to do things for her, to her, and all that mattered was her emotional response to him, as if a “man” were a product or service, and she’d finally chosen the right brand to get the right response. Was it possible she’d never seen or truly loved him the way he deserved to be loved? As a person? An ordinary, flawed, feeling person?

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


…the terrible though occurred to her that perhaps she’d always unconsciously believed that because Sam didn’t cry, he therefore didn’t feel, or he felt less, not as profoundly or deeply as she did. Her focus had always been on how his actions affected her feelings, as if his role was to do things for her, to her, and all that mattered was her emotional response to him, as if a “man” were a product or service, and she’d finally chosen the right brand to get the right response. Was it possible she’d never seen or truly loved him the way he deserved to be loved? As a person? An ordinary, flawed, feeling person?

— Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty


They would think she was savoring the taste (blueberries, cinnamon, cream-excellent), but she was actually savoring the whole morning, trying to catch it, pin it down, keep it safe before all those precious moments became yet another memory.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


We’d traveled, we’d been to lots of parties, lots of movies and concerts, we’d slept in. We’d done all those things that people with children seem to miss so passionately. We didn’t want those things anymore. We wanted a baby.

— Liane Moriarty, What Alice Forgot


Why did she give up wine for Lent? Polly was more sensible. She had given up strawberry jam. Cecilia had never seen Polly show more than a passing interest in strawberry jam, although now, of course, she was always catching her standing at the open fridge, staring at it longingly. The power of denial.

— Liane Moriarty, The Husband’s Secret


Mothers took their mothering so seriously now. Their frantic little faces…Ponytails swinging. Eyes fixed on the mobile phones held in the palms of their hands like compasses.

— Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies


We all, as parents, are laughing at ourselves and helicopter parenting and saying, ‘This isn’t the way we were parented; we were allowed to run free.’ When I talk to my friends, we are all fascinated by what we are doing, but we can’t seem to stop ourselves.

— Liane Moriarty


Google is my best friend and my worst enemy. It’s fabulous for research, but then it becomes addictive. I’ll have a character eating an orange, and next thing I’m Googling types of oranges, I’m visiting chat rooms about oranges, I’m learning the history of the orange.

— Liane Moriarty


Friends and family do not believe you write fiction. They truly believe that every word you write is either autobiographical or based on them. I once had a character say that she never wanted to be invited to another children’s birthday party, and I never received another children’s birthday party invitation ever again.

— Liane Moriarty